Tuesday: Hillary Discovers Suburbia

  • The Brookings Institution is holding a policy symposium February 15 to present a new report on the “first suburbs,” with keynote speaker Hillary Clinton. (The Brookings Institution)
  • 71 Clinton Fresh Food, which first brought fine dining to the Lower East Side, is closing. (Curbed)
  • Construction moves forward on Ariel West, after several injuries last summer. (The New York Times)
  • The “Iron Triangle” in Willets Point, Queens has been targeted by the New York City’s Economic Development Corporation. (New York Daily News)
  • Last week, we discovered plight of naming Hudson Square. This week, the real estate section picks a new, or rather old neighborhood: the Lower East Side. (The New York Times)
  • Brooke from the Upper East Side won the See My Artwork! contest at Apartment Therapy. Laura of Park Slope was robbed.
  • Will the “garishly neon-lit pedestrian” Fulton Mall be changed forever by developers? (Brooklyn Papers)
  • A new dance studio aims to bring culture downtown in the shadow of the old Tweed Courthouse. (The New York Times)
  • The city understands “culture better now,” and is allowing Chinatown restaurants to hang their meats on display. Yum! (New York Post)
  • Kate Ascher, executive vice president for infrastructure at the Economic Development Corporation, published a new picture book of the infrastructure of the city–just as her employer is in the midst of changing it. (Gotham Gazette)
  • WNYC reporter Andrea Berstein discusses the Prospect Heights streets that are awaiting the wrath of Forrest City Ratner. Also, she interviews avant garde filmmaker Karl Nussbaum about the death of small arts community in Brooklyn. (WNYC)
  • Findings of the 2005 New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey include: the median income for all households decreased over six points; the median montly gross rent increased almost 17 points; almost 29 percent of all renter households paid more than half of their income for gross rent. (The Report via Gotham Gazette)
  • The Department of Homeless Services changed policy to place transgender homeless clients into city shelters based on gender identity, after years of abuse in shelters that required legal identification. (City Limits)
  • - Riva Froymovich