Wednesday: Upscale Markets, Not Homes

  • More news on transforming the Battery Maritime Building, gateway to Governors Island, into an upscale green market. (The New York Times)
  • On the dark NYC streets, counting the homeless by neighborhood. (The Village Voice)
  • Would the Los Angeles Times’ solutions for homelessness work in New York?
  • The Village Voice gets to the crux of the issue: “The city needs new housing, just as it needs water. But it doesn’t need a flood of dangerous construction or rising rents to displace its own residents. The protections against these hazards are as suspect as the Gulf of Mexico levees.”
  • None of Sir Benjamin’s relatives want to take care of his $13 million estate; so, he’s looking for an heir. Stipulations: heterosexual and sober. (The New York Times)
  • Soon, white people will be the minority in the city and the suburbs. (Gotham Gazette)
  • Six developments throughout the city that are nonprofit corporations with Section 8 contracts established by local churches, but the reigning parishes aren’t paying attention. The churches in charge of the buildings seem to have relinquished all accountability for their upkeep. (City Limits)
  • Advocates are pushing for the McCain/Kennedy bill, which allows for the permanent residency of undocumented workers. But, are some local politicians playing favorites among the immigrant groups? (City Limits)
  • Forgotten NY reports that this city has the least number of official bike routes than any other. And Fresh Meadows in Queens, the westernmost suburb, is prepared for your car.
  • It’s true. You can meet your future spouse in a bar, even McSorley’s. (The Villager)
  • Silvercup Studios is setting the pace for transforming the parking garage into a mixed-use complex. (Metropolis)
  • On Monday, the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Fifth Avenue fascade was laid bare after a four-year restoration that cost $12.2 million. (New Yorkology)
  • - Riva Froymovich