Carolyn Ryan is [em]Times[/em] New Deputy Metro Editor

Carolyn Ryan, most recently a deputy managing editor at the Boston Globe, is staying within the Times Company family: She’s just been named a deputy metro editor for government and politics at the New York Times. Unfortunately, Ms. Ryan’s exit happens at a time when about two dozen Globe staffers have accepted buyouts.

Joe Sexton’s full (and lengthy!) memo after the jump, which includes thanking Globe editor Marty Baron and mentioning Ms. Ryan’s ping-pong prowess.

Michael Calderone

UPDATE: Adam Reilly at the The Phoenix now has Marty’s memo.

To: The Staff
From: Joe Sexton

I am thrilled to announce that Carolyn Ryan, the deputy managing editor for local news at The Boston Globe, will be the new deputy metro editor for government and politics.

Marty Baron, in making a gracious announcement to his newsroom in Boston, said of Carolyn, “Since joining the Globe in 1999, Carolyn has led coverage of many of our biggest news stories, bringing to them her trademark enthusiasm and innovative spirit. She has hired many of the exceptionally talented people on our Metro staff, and she has helped us move aggressively online with breaking news and multimedia packages.”

Here’s but a sampling of the kinds of things Carolyn tackled:
The Democratic National Convention in 2004, the legalization of same-sex marriage, the closing of Catholic churches in the Archdiocese of Boston, the search for a new president at Harvard, Mitt Romney’s run and the race to replace him, floods, storms, fires, explosions, the citywide terror scare that turned out to be a guerilla marketing campaign for Cartoon Network, the only American governor to give birth (twins) while in office, campaigns for United States Senate, United States House of Representatives, governor, mayor, City Council, State Legislature, countless crime stories, including the tale of a woman who killed her husband, stuffed him in a freezer, shipped it to a storage facility, and confessed to it all on her deathbed.

Marty’s word, of course, is gold with me. But Carolyn has many admirers here in New York who are eager to second Marty’s emotion. Pat Healy, who worked alongside Carolyn in Boston, is one. He describes Carolyn as an original thinker and real leader, someone funny and witty and also capable of simultaneously mapping out days worth of coverage on a breaking story.

“Carolyn is at once incredibly cool and incredibly competitive on a hot story (tabloids, beware),” Pat said. “No arena suits her more than politics — her skepticism and scrutiny have made the politicos of Boston sweat, and her passion for investigation and follow-up have exposed the more callous among them, all the while betraying not a hint of cynicism about the political world. She has loads of integrity, and is loads of fun — on a desk or on a bar stool.”

Carolyn, a former statehouse bureau chief for the Boston Herald, joined The Globe as deputy city editor, moved on to become political editor and was promoted in 2003 to be assistant managing editor for local news.

Asked her thoughts on the work of an editor, Carolyn answered this way:

“My view of editing is drawn in part from Maxwell Perkins. He said that it was an editor’s role to “release energy.” In a newsroom, it’s that and more. The best editors unleash the energy, creativity, and drive of those who work with them. For me, editing is most invigorating when I am igniting excitement in others. Reporters respond, in my view, to a good editor’s interest, discernment, high ambition and high expectations. Indeed, what really inspires reporters, in my experience, is an editor whose standards are high, whose interest in their work is deep and authentic, and whose understanding of them as human beings is genuine.”

I then pressed her for some biographical tidbits. Here’s what she produced.

She’s a maniacal ping pong player, an eager absorber of New York news and politics from afar, and the owner of well-preserved copies of the back pages of New York tabloids from Oct. 21, 2004.”

Seems like she’ll fit right in.

Carolyn steps into one of the most important and entertaining jobs in the joint. Rudy, Mike, George, Eliot, Hillary, Joe, Shelly, Christine, the Rev. Al. Oh, and K.T. and Jeanine. Wild and crazy. Daunting and vital.

She will have her hands full, but she will have the many able hands on this desk and beyond assisting her at every turn. And I have no doubt she has much to teach me.

I’d like also to conclude this announcement by publicly thanking Marty. I consider him a friend and an editor of honor and talent and impeccable collegiality. He’s engaged in a bruising fight up north, but has along with his staff continued to put out a world class paper. Its two Pulitzer finalists this year are only the latest evidence of that.
And he has been pure class with me.

Carolyn will join us as soon as it is comfortable for all involved.

Again, I am beyond excited.

Joe