Retired Ranger Leetch Unloads West Side Pad, Waterfall Included, for $3.71 M.

transfers brianleetch1v Retired Ranger Leetch Unloads West Side Pad, Waterfall Included, for $3.71 M. Even though the Upper West Side isn’t quite renowned for its brawn, NHL stars have been flocking there for years. Take Jaromir Jagr, who shares his apartment with fellow Czech Petr Prucha; or young goalie Henrik Lundqvist; or ex-Rangers Martin Rucinsky and Petr Sykora, who reportedly live in the same building.

But every time a hockey player moves away, the neighborhood’s overall burliness suffers an immense blow. Alas, recent retiree Brian Leetch, a high-scoring New York Rangers defenseman for more than 16 seasons, has sold his apartment at the Bromley on West 83rd Street for $3.718 million.

According to city records, the combined-unit apartment—two floors above Mr. Lundqvist’s new $1.75 million place—went to neighbors, lawyer Igor Kirman and his wife, Galina.

“We had a painter that came in,” Mr. Kirman said. “The first thing he said is, ‘It looks like an athlete lives here.’” The apartment’s 47-foot-wide living and dining room has a floor-to-ceiling waterfall, which the Leetch family “turned off because their kids figured out that it was fun to play with the water.”

Other hefty perks of the Bromley are an Olympic-size pool and a children’s playroom—“probably the biggest one on the Upper West Side,” Mr. Kirman said. Another bonus: Michael Moore has a place in the building.

This 2,406-square-foot apartment, which will be the Kirman family’s third place at the Bromley, was never officially on the market. But there was “a heated auction” through a real estate broker named Francine Blacher, who lives in the building.

In 2005, Ms. Blacher pleaded guilty to filing a false tax return, admitting to understating the income of her City Nest Realty company. She could have used Mr. Kirman, who was named one of 16 top corporate dealmakers by The American Lawyer in April. “It hasn’t won me any endorsements,” he said.

Mr. Leetch, on the other hand, was the first American-born hockey player to be named most valuable player of the NHL playoffs, in 1994, when the Rangers won their first championship in 54 years.