The Morning Read: Monday, July 16, 2007

Eliot Spitzer explains to New York magazine how he uses anger as a negotiating tactic, and says he has four years to change Albany.

In a three way race against Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani, only 13 percent of people in a recent Daily News poll said they would vote for Michael Bloomberg.

A Bloomberg presidential candidacy may spur a debate about electoral college reform.

Bloomberg said businesses could leave New York if the congestion problem isn’t fixed.

Upstate Republican congressman James Walsh learns about life in the minority party.

Democratic presidential candidate still have more money than their Republican counterparts.

Hillary Clinton has $9 million more in the bank than her nearest rival, Barack Obama.

But Obama has $1 million more than Clinton for the primaries.

Clinton is having a pancake fund-raiser in the Hamptons.

The Times looks at Clinton’s ties to Vinod Gupta, a supporter who named a school after the senator in India.

Newsweek has more details on the meltdown inside John McCain’s campaign.

An investigation in former state comptroller Alan Hevesi may be hampered because of missing paperwork.

The woman accusing Councilman Dennis Gallagher of rape shows off bruises she says she sustained during the attack.

A writer for the New Yorker says Michael Moore is “manipulative, smug, and self-righteous,” but that you should go and see his latest movie, Sicko.

Adam Nagourney wonders how important are political consultants.

A Washington Post columnist says Hillary Clinton is taking the Baker-Hamilton position on Iraq.

Christopher Bancroft is trying to block Rupert Murdoch’s effort to buy Dow Jones [subscription].

The Times editorial board says rules about politicians using state transportation is “fuzzy at best,” and that politicians should regularly make their itineraries public.

A New York Sun columnist explains why a do-it-or-else strategy employed by Spitzer and Bloomberg doesn’t work in Albany.

The Daily News says Sheldon Silver must “find a way” to support congestion pricing.

Get ready for the pope.
 
And now let’s all play with the New York Times interactive map of presidential donors.