The Morning Read: Monday, July 9, 2007

Some of the last pillars of support for a continued troop presence in Iraq are weakening.

Rudy Giuliani attended his first NASCAR race, wearing a blue blazer and khakis, which “did not exactly blend in among the throngs of men with tank tops and deep red tans.”

John D’Amato, who was managing Giuliani’s campaign in New York, passed away.

If elected president, Michael Bloomberg might govern the country in a bullpen outside the Oval Office.

Newsday wonders whether Bloomberg has been a better mayor than Giuliani.

New York magazine looks at Hillary and Bill Clinton campaigning together.

More than 100 cameras will be installed below Canal Street as part of the congestion pricing plan.

A report from the state Assembly says congestion pricing would be unfair to middle and low-income residents.

Drivers in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx would pay about 47 percent of the fees, the report says.

Eliot Spitzer’s aide approached at least one district attorney in the city to investigate Joe Bruno, according to Dicker.

Current investigations may reveal problems with how Alan Hevesi invested the state’s $154 pension when he was state comptroller.

Andrew Cuomo changed his mind about investigating an allegedly crooked lawyer in Brooklyn.

Staffer Viola Plummer is showing up to work today, despite being fired from the City Council.

The fight with Plummer may help Christine Quinn’s mayoral ambitions.

Rep. Greg Meeks’ top aide and his wife may run against each other for the City Council.

Cindy Sheehan is threatening to run against Nancy Pelosi.

There’s a partial state government shutdown in Pennsylvania.

Voters are excited about the field of presidential candidates, but are getting tired of the campaign season already.

While details can be hammered out later, “the state needs to sign off on a general plan,” for congestion pricing, says the New York Times editorial board.

Spitzer’s fight with Bruno is “a mixture of verbal vulgarity and abuse of police power,” says the New York Post editorial board.

In an op-ed, Jerry Nadler says, “We must ascertain why the federal government failed to protect the public and worsened a calamity.”

And Bloomberg has an op-ed on congestion pricing.