Caddyshack This, Baby! Spiffy Film Stars Morgan Freeman and Greg Kinnear Go Ga-Ga for Golf

transom kinnearfreeman1v Caddyshack This, Baby! Spiffy Film Stars Morgan Freeman and Greg Kinnear Go Ga Ga for GolfAt a dinner at the Hotel Plaza Athénée hotel on 64th Street and Madison Avenue following a screening of the new romantic comedy Feast of Love, the Transom found itself seated between co-stars Morgan Freeman and Greg Kinnear, and discovered that both men share a love of golf.

“Hey, Morgan,” said Mr. Kinnear, “you still”—he made a swing motion with his hands, carefully avoiding the various wine glasses cluttering the table.

“Am I breathing?” replied Mr. Freeman. He put his finger in his nose and mimicking a fish that had been hooked.

“Is he breathing?” echoed Mr. Freeman’s wife, Myrna Colley-Lee, a costume designer.

Mr. Kinnear, 44, has been playing since he was a young boy growing up in Logansport, Indiana. He boasts an impressive handicap of 9. Mr. Freeman, who is 70 and took up the sport 11 months ago, carries a not-so-good handicap of 26. The Transom has played about a dozen times, and is unsure of the exact severity of its handicap, as it is unsure of the rules when you tee off smacking a half-filled beer can rather than a Titliest. Burp!

“Did you find a trainer?” inquired Mr. Kinnear. Mr. Freeman said that he had, but that he only finds it helpful to use him once a week. “I’ve always been the kind of person who gets more from books,” he said. “I’ve just come off Seven Days at the Links of Utopia”—the subtitle of the David L. Cooks tome Golf’s Sacred Journey (Sacred Journey Stories).

“You got the perfect body of a golfer,” said Mr. Kinnear. “You just need to stop sucking at golf,”

A few years back, Mr. Kinnear said, he pulled a tendon in his wrist while driving at a Pro-Am. “You have to be a real asshole to pull this tendon, because it needs blood to heal and the blood does not get to this part of your wrist.”

Mr. Freeman, who has played on courses across the country, said the approach shot was his biggest hang-up. His strengths lie in his short and putting games. “If you can hit the ball straight, you can always draw it back,” he said, sounding like the old sage he plays in so many of his films. “It just takes practice.”