The ‘Loudness War’ Is Killing High Fidelity

122707 records2 web The Loudness War Is Killing High FidelityThe sound of a musician taking in a breath between verses, the soft screech of their fingers sliding across a guitar neck, finger cymbals clanging in the background, even the creek of a door opening or closing in the recording studio—these are some of the treasures of listening to music. But in Rolling Stone, Robert Levine writes an obituary for the subtle sounds lost in modern music recording. They’re casualties of what producers and engineers call "the loudness war."

Over the past decade and a half, a revolution in recording technology has changed the way albums are produced, mixed and mastered — almost always for the worse. "They make it loud to get [listeners’] attention," Bendeth says. Engineers do that by applying dynamic range compression, which reduces the difference between the loudest and softest sounds in a song. Like many of his peers, Bendeth believes that relying too much on this effect can obscure sonic detail, rob music of its emotional power and leave listeners with what engineers call ear fatigue. "I think most everything is mastered a little too loud," Bendeth says. "The industry decided that it’s a volume contest."

Producers and engineers call this "the loudness war," and it has changed the way almost every new pop and rock album sounds. But volume isn’t the only issue. Computer programs like Pro Tools, which let audio engineers manipulate sound the way a word processor edits text, make musicians sound unnaturally perfect. And today’s listeners consume an increasing amount of music on MP3, which eliminates much of the data from the original CD file and can leave music sounding tinny or hollow. "With all the technical innovation, music sounds worse," says Steely Dan’s Donald Fagen, who has made what are considered some of the best-sounding records of all time. "God is in the details. But there are no details anymore."