The Morning Read: Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Michael Bloomberg aides ask consultants who worked on his mayoral bids not to join any presidential campaign until they know if he will enter the race.

In explaining why he thinks the current Congress isn’t worldly enough to tackle globalization issues, Michael Bloomberg says the number of members that have passports "is dismally low. It really is scary.

Presidential nominees may not be known immediately after February 5, says Russell Berman.

There’s a February 2 rally to encourage Bloomberg to run.

Hillary Clinton pollster Mark Penn says he’s good when the pressure is on.

The new subpoenas issued to Eliot Spitzer’s office by David Soares signal “a more aggressive approach in his investigation,” writes Danny Hakim.

Obviously, we are cooperating fully,” Spitzer told reporters yesterday.

Soares wants to know who encouraged Darren Dopp to sign a sworn statement that investigators say may not be truthful.

The Nonsense Never Ends,” is the headline on a Staten Island Advance story about Spitzer’s deal to have an oversight committee run the state’s horse racing facilities until a new contract can be negotiated with N.Y.R.A.

Bill Hammond doesn’t like Spitzer’s deal with N.Y.R.A.

Barack Obama and John Edwards try not attacking each other, since they’re both hoping to stop Hillary Clinton.

Matt Drudge thinks that Mike Huckabee’s "Christmas" ad features a ‘floating cross.’

David Brooks makes the case for Barack Obama, writing, “character and self-knowledge matter more than even experience.

Sam Brownback is still pushing for a nuke-free Iran an op-ed in The Sun.

The Washington Post asks if “Bush hatred can end a friendship.”

Clinton supporter Bob Kerrey continues making statements about how great it is that Obama has ties to the Muslim world.

On Hannity & Colmes. Rudy Giuliani uses a baseball metaphor to explain reducing his New England ad expenditures.

And a judge thinks Bernie Kerik’s defense lawyer could give "compelling" testimony against him, but doesn’t make a ruling.