New York Review of Books Closes on Lease at 435 Hudson

37375976 2a43c1cef9 b New York Review of Books Closes on Lease at 435 HudsonThe New York Review of Books is officially moving out of 1755 Broadway, joining in the stream of media firms to Hudson Square. The 45-year-old biweekly has signed a lease for 15,049 square feet at Trinity Real Estate’s 435 Hudson Street, at the northern reaches of the district.

The Review has been bumped out of its current space as fellow tenant Universal Music had expansion options built into its contract.

Our colleague Leon Neyfakh reported the pending move in December.

Press Release from Trinity below:

 

HUDSON SQUARE WELCOMES LITERARY GIANT

The New York Review of Books Relocates to 435 Hudson Street

New York, January 18, 2008 – Trinity Real Estate today announced that The New York Review of Books, America’s foremost chronicler of literary and film criticism, will move to 435 Hudson Street in Hudson Square.

The New York Review of Books will occupy 15,049 s.f. of commercial space on the third floor of 435 Hudson Street. It is relocating from 1755 Broadway.

Carl Weisbrod, President of Trinity Real Estate said, “As Hudson Square continues to evolve as a media hub, it is fitting that we also become home to one of America’s most distinguished intellectual publications, The New York Review of Books. The creative vibe of our dynamic neighborhood will be enhanced by its newest occupant.”

Ralph Giordano represented The New York Review of Books in the lease negotiation. At the time of this transaction he was with CB Richard Ellis. (Mr. Giordano has since moved to Grubman Ellis.) Trinity was represented by Jason Pizer, Senior Vice President and Thomas Lynch, Assistant Vice President. Asking rents in the building are in the low-$50s range.

About The New York Review of Books

With a national circulation of over 125,000, The New York Review of Books has established itself, in Esquire’s words, as "the premier literary-intellectual magazine in the English language." Every two weeks, the country’s most influential writers publish essays and reviews of books and the arts, including music, theater, dance, and film—from Woody Allen’s Manhattan to Kurosawa’s version of King Lear. What has made The New York Review successful, according to The New York Times, is its "stubborn refusal to treat books, or the theatre and movies, for that matter, as categories of entertainment to be indulged in when the working day is done."

About Trinity Church and Hudson Square

The Parish of Trinity Church, one of New York City’s largest and oldest commercial property owners, maintains a portfolio of more than six million square feet. The 9-story, 265,360 square-foot building at 435 Hudson Street is located along the full block front between Leroy and Morton Streets. It is home to a variety of tenants, including insurance firm Jefferson National Financial Corp., L’Oreal, Radical Media, real estate developer Young Woo & Associates, LLC. and Deluxe Entertainment Services Group Inc.