Surrogates Market Hillary's Emotion: Lots of 'Warmth' and 'Voice'

howardwolfson Surrogates Market Hillary's Emotion: Lots of 'Warmth' and 'Voice'Over the course of a conference call with Howard Wolfson, Terry McAuliffe and a number of high-profile Hillary Clinton supporters, some variation of the phrase "found her voice in New Hampshire" was used at least six times.

New Jersey Senator Bob Menendez said it first, but it was repeated by McAuliffe, Wolfson and Washington State Senator Maria Cantwell. From Chuck Schumer we heard that Hillary is "in touch with what people need and want," from Cantwell that in the last two days before New Hampshire she saw the "passion" in Hillary, and that the candidate is "connecting and connecting with women."

Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas noted that voters were "passionate, they were connected to the Clintons…they see her as having ideas and as being an inspiration." California Senator Dianne Feinstein added that "there is a great emotional connection between woman and Hillary."

And when asked later to elaborate on why how important "that moment" (that moment being, from now on, the moment Hillary cried), Feinstein said, "i think it showed the humanity and real warmth…[of] Hillary at her core." The Senator emphasized that it was "totally spontaneous" and added "that feeling coming out is really important, because we identify with it."

So this is the new Hillary Clinton. Forget the asbestos pantsuit, the woman who was "in it to win it."

Sure, she is still, as Cantwell said, "about the issues," but now she is talking "about the issues in her own voice," as the Senator added.

And sure, she still has huge amounts of establishment support, especially the superdelegates, as McAuliffe stressed, and the entire congressional delegation of New York, as Schumer pointed out.

But now we learn from Feinstein that she and Cantwell "know her very well…we know how she functions," before the Senator went on to make the previously mentioned comment about the "humanity and warmth" at Clinton’s "core."

The Clinton "machine" is now a factory of emotion. The campaign learned something from its very brief failure, and it looks like voters will be getting lots and lots and lots of the softer side of Hillary, heretofore unknown. As McAuliffe promised shortly before the call ended, "you’re going to see more of the Hillary you saw in New Hampshire."