Aaron Charney Gets the Best Revenge: Ex-Sullivan & Cromwell Minion Will Live Well in $1.49 M. Condo

transfers aaroncharney1h Aaron Charney Gets the Best Revenge: Ex Sullivan & Cromwell Minion Will Live Well in $1.49 M. CondoThe most riveting recent scandal within Manhattan’s white-shoe law firm world is, without a doubt, the story of Aaron Charney. Last January, at age 28, he sued his fancy firm, Sullivan & Cromwell, alleging homophobia. Among other things, his suit said that a partner tossed papers at his feet and said, “Bend over and pick it up—I’m sure you like that.”

The suit was settled by October, and within a few weeks The Observer was one of many participating in a citywide parlor game, guessing about Mr. Charney’s bounty. (Scatological insults might have upped his money, we posited, but the fact that Mr. Charney destroyed his hard drive by boiling it twice with hot water and pounding it with a hammer may have hurt him.)

A deed filed in city records suggests that the Sullivan settlement wasn’t minor: Mr. Charney and a partner just paid $1.495 million for a penthouse at the newly converted condo at 93rd Street and Broadway.

According to the floor plan, they’ll have two bedrooms, a 17-foot-long living/dining room and an L-shaped terrace that stretches 50 feet on each wing. The listing broker, Halstead’s Louise Phillips Forbes, declined to name the buyers, but she said the place was on the market for less than a week before “they scooped it up.”

The 987-square-foot terrace, nearly as big as the interior space, is edged by high walls, which means there’s privacy instead of views. “I would consider it extremely private, with an opportunity to take your inside living outdoors,” the broker said.

When Colin Powell and his wife bought in the building, The Observer reported last year, they chose an apartment without the $135,000 “upgrade package” offered by developers (with name-brand appliances and subway tiles). But Mr. Charney’s apartment came with the Sub-Zero and other bonuses, which means he might be living more glamorously than the former secretary of state, at least as far as kitchen appliances go.