Murdoch on Fox: He's 'Very Friendly' with Hillary, and He Wants to Change Culture of the Journal

rupertmurdochrobertthomson 2 Murdoch on Fox: He's 'Very Friendly' with Hillary, and He Wants to Change Culture of the JournalRupert Murdoch was on Fox News’ Your World with Neil Cavuto this afternoon and discussed how he had "no ill-will" against Hillary Clinton and how he planned to change the culture of the Wall Street Journal (in part, by moving their offices to Midtown). "I think, when you take over a company and you want to make changes, it is good to do everything you can to change the culture. And a physical move is a big and useful thing to do," said Mr. Murdoch.

CAVUTO: Besides the good numbers that you registered here, Mr. Murdoch, everybody was abuzz when The New York Post, your — your signature paper in the United States, besides The Wall Street Journal, had endorsed Barack Obama. What was behind that? Some are insinuating that maybe ill will with Hillary Clinton. What?

MURDOCH: No. There is no ill will with Senator Clinton at all. And, in fact, we have a very friendly relationship. But I think the editorial board there and the editors felt that Obama was a real chance for something new, and we didn’t agree with a lot of Mrs. Clinton’s national policies, although we did think she had been a very good senator in New York State.

CAVUTO: All right. So, this had nothing to do with the fact that Hillary Clinton — I am not saying kowtowed, but did not make it a point to seek out the Post editorial board to explain her positions or any of this that has been rumored, none of that?

MURDOCH: None in the least, no.

CAVUTO: OK.

MURDOCH: And she is quite available to our editorial board.

CAVUTO: OK.

MURDOCH: She’s made that quite clear.

. . .

CAVUTO: OK. On to The Wall Street Journal and how that is moving along. There had been talk, as well, that a lot of the editorial, the reporters, the like, are coming to be coming to midtown Manhattan from downtown Manhattan. A, is that true? And, B, what are you going to do with them when they do get uptown?

(LAUGHTER)

MURDOCH: No, but we would like to do that. We have not worked it out fully yet. I think, when you take over a company and you want to make changes, it is good to do everything you can to change the culture. And a physical move is a big and useful thing to do.

CAVUTO: Is that to say, Mr. Murdoch, a physical move for everyone or just the lion’s share of the editorial staff? Who? What?

MURDOCH: Oh, it would be for everybody.

CAVUTO: Oh, really? OK. So, whatever operations they have downtown, there won’t be?

MURDOCH: We would move up. That’s the — that’s the plan, or that’s the hope.

CAVUTO: OK. And by when do you want to do this?

MURDOCH: I think it would take a year.

. . . .

CAVUTO: OK. Any other changes afoot? There had been talk that you wanted to make The Wall Street Journal online subscription service a free service. I know you are going to give a lot more of it away, but it won’t entirely be free. What is the latest on that?

MURDOCH: That’s right. We are going to widen what we do now for free, go for a bigger audience and more advertising. But, equally, the real analysis and the depth of the WSJ.com will be developed and probably have its prices increased over time. That’s where the value is to the professionals all over the world. We see, actually, the electronic and online possibilities of Dow Jones as being the most exciting part of the business.