The Morning Read: Thursday, February 28, 2008

Michael Bloomberg finally says, without parsing, that he’s not running.

Although there’s still chatter about the possibility of Bloomberg being a vice presidential candidate.

The “political classes began to tire of the mixed signals” from Bloomberg, and his political allies were endorsing other candidates, writes Diane Cardwell.

Bloomberg says he hasn’t watched any of the presidential debates.

Dave Seifman, in an opinion piece, calls Bloomberg’s presidential bid a ‘con job” and says the mayor decived voters for two years about possibly running.

On Bloomberg, Hank Sheinkopf says, “He looked at the numbers and figured out he couldn’t win."

Doug Muzzio said Bloomberg was uncharismatic, and that he “can’t move a turnip with his speech.”

Perhaps the Bloomberg team decided it was time to stop toying with the media now that the field is narrowed and the race is well underway,” writes Melissa Russo of WNBC.

Doug Schoen said Bloomberg could spend money to support the presidential candidate he prefers.

Danny Hakim leads his story about Joe Bruno by noting that the Republican Majority leader has been “humbled” and that his conference is “aging.”

Fred Dicker says little would change if Democrats took over the state Senate.

The mayor’s congestion pricing plan still seems unlikely to pass the legislature, say legislators.

The Queens District Attorney wants Dennis Gallagher to resign from office and not register as a sex offender, as part of a plea that would keep Gallagher out of jail [clarified].

Time magazine refers to Bill Clinton as “the bitter half.”

Hillary Clinton “refuses to buckle,” says an English newspaper.

Clinton supporter Bob Kerrey wants a new way of picking presidents.

Paul Silver thinks Bloomberg can help steer the major presidential candidates back towards the political center.

Would-be Bloomberg drafter Andrew MacRae says thanks for the coverage.

And the Daily News editorial board says the G.O.P.-controlled State Senate has no credibility with voters anymore.