Wednesday, April 30th

Deforest this, Mrs. Roosevelt! Picasso’s granddaughter, Diana, has designed an eco-T-shirt! So have other muggly-glubs such as actresses Scarlett Johansson and Camilla Belle; Vanity Fair fashion and style director Michael Roberts; and Brazilian model Caroline Trentini. You can have a gander at a Rainforest Foundation bash hosted by fancy-dress designer Carlos Miele and Vogue magazine, with an assist from attendees such as towering nightlife glamazon Amy Sacco, dermo-socialite Lisa Airan and woolly-headed socialite Arden Wohl. “The deforestation of the Amazon is contributing to global climate change, which affects us all,” said Mr. Miele in an e-mail. “Warmed seas and changing weather patterns are creating new and profound risks for people and the environment.” Asked to describe the eco-practices of his own company, Mr. Miele said, “I try to utilize the most out of fabrics. We recycle leftover fabrics and use them with Brazilian handcraft technique called ‘fuxico’—the dresses turn out amazing!” Also: “I use an innovate pool cleaning system in my house in Florianopolis, which focuses on salt chlorinator. It is a great way to balance the water within the pool and still be able to help the environment.” (We’re still stuck on Florianopolis. …) And finally: “I recently have replaced every single light bulb in both my house and company with environmentally friendly light bulb.” Give the man an eco-medal! Moving on to altruism in the arts, Free Arts NYC—which brings “the healing power of art” to underserved children—auctions off polaroids by art stars Kehinde Wiley, Chuck Close and Marilyn Minter at Phillips de Pury. Hosts include smoldering Brit Clive Owen (pant, pant!), Amy Sacco again, and Mary Alice Stephenson, host of America’s Most Smartest Model (you know we’ve been meaning to watch it…). For America’s most smartest political junkies, the American Society of Magazine Editors hosts a smarty-pants panel of leftists including Michelle Cottle (The New Republic), Matt Taibbi (Rolling Stone) and Katrina vanden Heuvel (The Nation), moderated by NBC robo-anchor Brian Williams. These poor shmucks—imagine how much they must dread yet another few hours of thinking and talking about the Democratic primary. Hillary hurts our brain, and makes us want to take a nap—in Clive Owen’s trousers! Meanwhile, cartoonists join the anthology craze! The Dorothy Parker Society hosts New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly and other contributors to Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love … in 200 Cartoons at the Algonquin Hotel. “I’ve always been fascinated as to why there aren’t more women in cartooning and humor in general,” said Ms. Donnelly, who conceived the idea for the book, when we called her up. “Our society has typically chronicled love and sex from the male point of view. It’s time for more women to be out there on the front lines.” To that end, Sex & Sensibility explores “how the rules are changing between men and women, or maybe they’re not.” (We still make no money and do all the dishes; now we just don’t have husbands to blame it on!) Dorothy Parker, she added, was “one of the best humorists we ever had. I don’t want to call her a woman humorist; that’s a pet peeve of mine.” Ms. Donnelly has scribbled for The New Yorker since 1982. Pressed to name her best cartoons ever, she said: “One that seems to be very popular is a woman standing outside of her New York City apartment with a guy she’s just been on a date with, and she says, ‘I’d invite you up, but my life’s a mess.’ And then there’s another one I like a lot; it’s a little girl who said, ‘Mom, some kids at school called you a feminist but I punched them out.’”

[Carlos Miele cocktail, 408 West 14th Street, 7 p.m., invite only; Portraits & Polaroids, Phillips de Pury & Company, 450 West 15th Street, third floor, 7 p.m., 212-974-9092; ASME Members Lunch & Annual Meeting, Hearst Tower, 300 West 57th Street, noon to 2:15 p.m.; Dorothy Parker Society cartoonists’ event, Algonquin Hotel, 59 West 44th Street, 6:30 p.m.]

Wednesday, April 30th