The 100 Most Powerful People in New York Real Estate

 

80

Richard Lipsky

Lobbyist, Richard Lipsky Associates

To many large developers, particularly those who build big-box retail, Mr. Lipsky is a pain in the ass. He organizes public opposition and pitches to the media a constant David vs. Goliath story line, usually with small retailers, threatened by the Vornados and the Related Companies of the world, playing the David role.

 

81

Paula Del Nunzio

Managing Director at Brown Harris Stevens

Unlike Dolly Lenz, she doesn’t appear in BlackBerry ads or on Fox News, but Ms. Del Nunzio has helped turn uptown mansions into commodities worth more than the G.D.P. of some nations. She set a $40 million townhouse record in 2006, but broke that with a still-reigning $53 million sale.

 

82

Thomas Frieden

New York City Health Commissioner

The epidemiologist has presided over the most massive reactionary crackdown on city restaurants in years, shuttering some 200 locations in six weeks after an embarrassing video showed rats overrunning a recently inspected eatery.

 

83

Jesse Masyr

Partner, Wachtel & Masyr LLP

A key party in some of the city’s largest development deals, Mr. Masyr, attorney for the Related Companies, is currently the lead private-sector negotiator in talks for the future of Coney Island.

 

84

Tom Colicchio

Chef and Owner of Craft, Craftsteak, Craftbar and ’Wichcraft restaurants

Danny Meyer’s former partner at Gramercy Tavern continues to expand his own culinary empire to 15 locations, with separate ’Wichcraft kiosks opening soon in Herald Square and Greeley Square.

 

85

Nicolai Ouroussoff

Chief Architecture Critic for The New York Times

The great champion of New York starchitecture happens to not like the term, which he calls a portmanteau for the “churlish.” His love for name-brand architecture is nearly ceaseless (in March he called big-designer condos “gorgeous tokens” of New York vanity), and it’s also captivating.

 

86

Marvin Markus

Chairman of the Rent Guidelines Board

Sometimes decried as a “stooge for the landlords,” the man in charge of regulating monthly rates for one million apartments citywide is actually an equal-opportunity offender. Turns out property owners didn’t think much of the latest round of rent hikes, either.

 

87

Jonathan Miller

President and CEO of Miller Samuel

His huge market reports for Elliman can stir up exhilaration or dread about the state of the city, the kind of thing that makes or breaks a bubble. Plus, his firm did $5 billion in Manhattan evaluations last year, which means there’s a relatively good chance he’s appraised you.

 

88

Andrew Berman

Executive Director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

Building anything new in Greenwich Village can be an extraordinarily trying, if not impossible, experience today, in large part due to the well-organized resistance of Mr. Berman.

 

89

Richard Brodsky

Member and Chair, Committee on Corporations, Authorities and Commissions, New York State Assembly

The loudest legislative critic of New York City’s approach to mega-projects, Richard Brodsky of Westchester takes seriously his role as chairman of the committee that oversees the state’s development agency. He was the most visible opponent of congestion pricing in Albany.

 

 

 

90

Keith McNally

Restaurateur

From Odeon to Pastis to Schiller’s Liquor Bar, the former bellhop turned eatery titan is often at the forefront of a neighborhood’s renaissance. Now, the Balthazaar boss is aiming to revive Greenwich Village’s ancient Minetta Tavern.

 

91

Lockhart Steele

Publisher of Curbed Network

Armed with a reported $1.5 million in financing, the ubiquitous blogger, who changed the way New Yorkers gossip about what’s going on (and up) in their neighborhoods, is now extending the sewing circle to more cities. First up: Chicago. Then, who knows? “Curbed Tallahassee’s not launching next month or anything like that,” he said.

 

92

David Levinson

Chairman and CEO of L&L Holding Co.

Mr. Levinson, formerly of CB Richard Ellis, left in 2005 to found L&L. The firm now owns and manages a five-million-square-foot portfolio that includes 142 West 57th Street and 195 Broadway in the Financial District, to which Mr. Levinson recently lured Omnicom Group.

 

93

Joseph Sitt

Principal, Thor Equities

Having snapped up land in Coney Island’s amusement district, he’s got the city—and its plan to turn that land into a modern-day Vegas on the Atlantic—under his thumb. Or maybe the city, wielding the threat of rezoning said location into parkland, has him under its thumb. Either way.