Weekend in Review: Another Stimulus, McCain’s Tone, the ‘Lauder Clause’

rah Weekend in Review: Another Stimulus, McCains Tone, the Lauder ClauseAs the economy has yet to improve, Congress may be called back to Washington after the election to pass an economic stimulus package.

Europe is pledging cooperative action.

Without cooperative action, here’s what will happen, according to a Washington Post op-ed: "financial war."

To survive the financial crisis, New York State government has to be reorganized, writes the Democrat & Chronicle.

Or there are always slot machines!

McCain’s mortgage plan contradicts the Paulson plan McCain endorsed, writes Nicole Gelinas.

Barack Obama was endorsed by the Toledo Blade, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and several other swing-state newspapers.

Esteemed Congressman and civil rights activist John Lewis released a statement warning John McCain about permitting an "atmosphere of hate."

McCain recently spoke publicly about how much he admires Lewis.

Washington Post columnist Khaled Hosseini and pollster John Zogby are both critical of how McCain has responded to supporters who bring up Obama, Arabs or Muslims.

The chairman of the Virginia State Republican Party compared Obama to Osama bin Laden.

McCain had to disown another statement by a supporter who introduced him saying non-Christian people are praying for Obama to win.

McCain starting pushing back against his very-anti-Obama supporters this weekend. 

John Riley is skeptical of how sincere it was.

When Obama acknowledged that McCain had done that, his supporters booed.

The embattled Republican Senator Norm Coleman did not go to a McCain rally this weekend.

A report ruled Sarah Palin abused her authority as governor when she pressured an appointee to fire her former brother-in-law.

Palin appears to have stopped talking about Bill Ayers, but has taken up attacking Obama over his position on abortion.

A judge ordered Palin to preserve emails in a private account she used for official business.

The A.P. reports that Palin and her family used state money to travel to religious events, including speaking to young missionaries at her church in Wasilla.

Sign of times: Palin is being sent to campaign in West Virginia.

She received “almost deafening” boos at a Flyers game.

McCain has new economic proposals, though he hasn’t said what they are.

"It’s my job to have contact with the media," said Sarah Palin, mayor of Wasilla, Alaska.

The co-founder of conservative blog site Redstate voted for Bobby Jindal for president, writing, "Do I believe in John McCain? Not as much as I used to. Do I believe in Sarah Palin? Despite my early enthusiasm for her, now not at all. Do I believe in the national Republican Party? Not in the slightest."

Rick Davis is now advocating Americans vote for McCain to avoid a united Democratic government.

Lynn Sweet notes that Hillary Clinton is keeping track of exactly how much money she’s raising for Obama.

At the last minute, a "Ron Lauder" clause was added into the term-limits bill.

Christine Quinn, as expected, backed Michael Bloomberg’s bid to extend term limits. The Daily News quotes an anonymous source saying Quinn will cite "the economy."

Ed Koch also backs Bloomberg.

Quinn tried to convince freshman Council members that they, too, would get three terms.

Mayoral candidate Bill Thompson gets God on his side.

The Brooklyn Optimist considers how many statewide politicians will benefit from the bill.

Bloomberg butters up the nonprofit world.

Dan Jacoby thinks Sheldon Silver could single-handedly boost the State Senate Democrats, but he won’t.

George Will does not approve of what Bloomberg’s doing.

Norman Oder wonders what effect Forest City Ratner’s falling stock price will have on Atlantic Yards.

Upstate congressional candidate Alice Kryzan will most likely replace Jon Powers of the W.F.P. line.

The state environmental agency said it will look into a few issues before natural gas companies are allowed to start drilling.

North Korea got off the terrorist list.

And there are just 100 days left of George W. Bush.