Atlantic Yards: ’09’s $4 B. Question

brown 19 0 Atlantic Yards: 09s $4 B. QuestionIn this week’s print Observer, Eliot Brown lays out the financing questions surrounding Brooklyn’s mightiest development in modern times:

For now, with Forest City still planning to build at some point, the question becomes how long the developer can keep doling money out without seeing any come back in. Forest City is awaiting what is likely the last major court challenge to the use of eminent domain, with a decision expected in the first half of 2009. But even if that concludes in its favor, as many legal experts expect it will, the developer may very well have an additional wait ahead of it. At this point it is unclear—many would say unlikely—that in six months to a year, investors would be willing to provide the nearly $1 billion in bonds needed for an arena or other financing for high-rise residential developments.

In this week’s print Observer, Eliot Brown lays out the financing questions surrounding Brooklyn’s mightiest development in modern times:

For now, with Forest City still planning to build at some point, the question becomes how long the developer can keep doling money out without seeing any come back in. Forest City is awaiting what is likely the last major court challenge to the use of eminent domain, with a decision expected in the first half of 2009. But even if that concludes in its favor, as many legal experts expect it will, the developer may very well have an additional wait ahead of it. At this point it is unclear—many would say unlikely—that in six months to a year, investors would be willing to provide the nearly $1 billion in bonds needed for an arena or other financing for high-rise residential developments.

The Wall Street Journal‘s Alex Frangos and Jonathan Karp added its own two cents on the project’s viability, reporting that Atlantic Yards architect Frank Gehry had laid off a dozen staffers related to the project.

What will 2009 bring? Just askin’.

Article continues below
More from Politics
STAR OF DAVID OR 'PLAIN STAR'?   If you thought "CP Time" was impolitic, on July 2 Donald Trump posted a picture on Twitter of a Star of David on top of a pile of cash next to Hillary Clinton's face. You'd think after the aforementioned crime stats incident (or after engaging a user called "@WhiteGenocideTM," or blasting out a quote from Benito Mussolini, or...) Trump would have learned to wait a full 15 seconds before hitting the "Tweet" button. But not only was the gaffe itself bad, the attempts at damage control made the BP oil spill response look a virtuoso performance.  About two hours after the image went up on Trump's account, somebody took it down and replaced it with a similar picture that swapped the hexagram with a circle (bearing the same legend "Most Corrupt Candidate Ever!"!). Believe it or not, it actually got worse from there. As reports arose that the first image had originated on a white supremacist message board, Trump insisted that the shape was a "sheriff's star," or "plain star," not a Star of David. And he continued to sulk about the coverage online and in public for days afterward, even when the media was clearly ready to move on. This refusal to just let some bad press go would haunt him later on.
Donald Trump More Or Less Says He’ll Keep On Tweeting as President