Spic ‘n’ Span Son of Tom Hanks Shines Up the Great White Way:

“Quite honestly, I’m sick to death of the subject. It’s something that will come up until the day I die,” said Mr. Hanks. “That said, I knew going in that it was going to be the case, so I can’t say I’m surprised. The strange thing really is that I didn’t really think about it that much before, but when you’re constantly asked what your favorite color is and you give an answer, and they go, no seriously, you start wondering … ‘Oh my God, is green not my favorite color? I do like blue.’ … It’s forced me to think about things in a way I don’t think about, and that was a little frustrating starting out. But I’m glad I was able to do something with my dad. Films live forever, so we’ll forever have that. We did it, it was really fun, and I’m glad it was something that I’m really proud of.”

His Buck Howard director, Sean McGinly, noted Mr. Hanks’ special aplomb in dealing with the various pressures of the business. “He takes it all in stride,” said Mr. McGinly, via telephone from Los Angeles. “I know millions of actors and Colin is one of the more calm and un-neurotic ones that I’ve come across. And he has a lot more reasons to be neurotic than many of my friends who are tortured actors.” Mr. Hanks was the first person attached to the project, almost five years ago, and Mr. McGinly said that he was instrumental in bringing the project to the big screen, and had also become a close friend.

33 Variations, which runs through the end of May, is still changing on a day-to-day basis. “It evolves every night,” Mr. Hanks said, happily naming specific moments from the show he thinks have improved, clearly relishing the creative process and being a part of an ensemble. Rehearsals began during President Obama’s inauguration, and Mr. Hanks said the president’s words about being judged on what you build, not what you tear down, had stuck with him.

“As cheesy as that sounds, it kind of set the tone for what the whole thing is,” he said. “I’m exhausted, and there’s been so many changes, but that’s the building process … and it’s not boring! The interesting thing is that it happens in front of 1,000 people ever night.”

Five minutes before going onstage he listens to Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run.”

“If that song doesn’t make the hair on your neck stand up …” He shook his head and grinned. “I don’t know what it is, it’s an emotional thing, it loosens me up. I walk under the cross-under and say, “Is anyone alive out there?” just like Bruce does, and then I’m off to do the show.”