Keith Haring Meets Mr. Belvedere, for $35K

  • Even zippy, adorable, deified pop artists can’t save Manhattan’s luxury real estate these days. A $13.25 million listing for the 8,300-square-foot triplex at 260 West Broadway, famous for its in-house Keith Haring mural—discovered on a concrete wall behind a coat closet—has come off the market. Now, sadly, the apartment is only available for rent. At $35,000 a month.

    “Should a buyer surface, the owners, of course, remain interested, and we are at the ready to take them through,” Halstead broker Jane Greenberg told The Observer. “At the owners’ request”—the place reportedly belongs to developer Richard Saunders and a group of investors—“we are simply focusing on the rental possibility for the time being.”

    On the plus side, that makes this the only New York rental whose floor plan shows a 47-foot-long balcony (or “belvedere”), a 42-foot-long grand salon, a 22-foot-long patio, a home gym, a wine cellar, a sprawl separated into a “game room” and a “media room” and, of course, a foyer whose cement west wall features a nice big Haring doodle. - Max Abelson

    Halstead.

  • The staircase, Halstead’s listing says, is made from “curved steel and oak.”

  • This 46.75-foot-long belvedere has nothing to do with the late ’80s butler-based sitcom starring Christopher Hewett. It’s a very, very, very nice balcony.

  • The concrete Haring mural, sadly, is not movable. “It’s really just part of the space,” Mr. Saunders told New York magazine last year. “Like the ceiling height or the view.” (Haring or no, the apartment’s price bounced from $16,995,000 to $14,950,000 to $12,995,000, then up to $13.25 million.)

  • There’s this mechanical closet, another upstairs and two on the lower level (which are both nearly the size of the staff room). The rich like to keep their mechanicals well housed.

  • Salon-appreciating Europeans will be glad to know that the main sprawl isn’t just 42 feet long and 36.9 feet wide; it’s also 12.8 by 11.2 meters.

  • The fireplace is surrounded by a floor-to-ceiling limestone wall, Halstead’s listing says. Classy.

  • The lower level is zoned commercially, so a fashion designer or artsy type might live in the top two floors and set up shop downstairs, Ms. Greenberg said.

  • This unnamed 15.5-foot-long room could theoretically be a cruel and windowless maid’s room—or, more realistically, a storage space.

  • Anytime an apartment begins with both a vestibule and a foyer (which, after all, are basically synonyms), you know you’re in good shape. Two entryways is the new one entryway!

  • Note that the lady’s bathroom has a bathtub, but the gentleman’s only has a shower. (The Time Warner Center penthouse that the Russian oligarch Andrei Vavilov bought this year also had a his-and-her bathroom tub inequality; this unjust pattern must be stopped immediately.)

  • What do these dots represent? Detailed cast-iron columns.

  • The 324-square-foot home gym is almost exactly the same size as the master bedroom.

  • No one is living full time in the triplex, co-broker Chris Pomeroy said. When Mr. Saunders is out of town, the place is "sitting pretty."