Reverse Drop-Off?

A reader pointed out to me last night that more people voted in the public advocate and comptroller primary races than in the mayoral primary.

Granted, the public advocate and comptroller races were competitive and garnered more attention. But it’s funny to think of primary voters showing up at the polls and actually not voting for the top of the ticket.

This reader called it the “reverse drop-off” effect.

According to the latest, unofficial numbers, 311,491 votes were cast in the Democratic primary for mayor.

354,293 votes were cast in the primary for comptroller, and 347,293 votes were cast in the comptroller race.

UPDATE: Bill Thompson told reporters the reverse drop-off was just a function of the fact that his race wasn’t as competitive as the others. Here’s what he said, courtesy of a colleague who attended Thompson’s press conference today:

Q: More people turned out to vote for down ballot races than the mayor’s race. Are you disheartened by the fact that people came out to vote for public advocate and comptroller and sat out mayor’s race?

A: “Not in the least. There’s always something that you can find. I got over 70 percent yesterday in the primary. I think that’s a relatively decent number … not to pat yourself on the back. And whatever happens in the primary, I think voters are definitely going to come out in November looking for change, looking for somebody different, looking for different leadership in this city, looking for somebody who will be there for them.”

Q: Just to follow up, why do you think people did sit out your primary even though they voted for down ballot races?

A: “I think if you look at most of the races, there’s usually interest shown in the local Council races and others – those were the hot races. I think that many people looked at the race for mayor, at least in the primary, as kind of a foregone conclusion and I think that’s why it didn’t generate as much interest as it could’ve. But that was the primary. We’re talking about the November election and the direction this city’s going to go in.”