After the Dopp Decision, Bruno Still Wants His Pound of Flesh

ALBANY—The Commission on Public Integrity's decision to fine Darren Dopp $10,000 for his role in the ‘Troopergate' affair doesn't go far enough, former Senate Majority Leader Joe Bruno said through a spokesman.

"The Commission on Public Integrity has concluded that, while working for Elliot Spitzer, Darren Dopp joined with and used the media in an attempt to destroy Joe Bruno, who was Gov Spitzer's political opponent," Bruno spokesman Kris Thompson said late yesterday. "While the Senator feels that this misuse of authority has now been uncovered, he hopes all of those who were responsible will be made to answer for what they did. No one and no media outlet should be absolved of their wrongdoing since Mr Dopp did not act on his own."

Bruno was the target of ‘Troopergate,' in which documents detailing his travel were provided by the Spitzer administration to the Times Union. Many see Dopp, who served as Spitzer's communications director, as a fall guy for Spitzer himself. (Dopp has insisted he acted at Spitzer's direction.) Dopp was charged by the commission along with William Howard, Richard Baum and Preston Felton.  Baum and Howard settled the charges against them; Felton's hearing has not been scheduled.