Morning Read: An Open Door to the White House, A Closed Door on the D Train

He wouldn’t share a stage with fellow Democrat Bill Thompson, but President Obama invited Thompson’s campaign rival, Mayor Bloomberg, to attend a White House state dinner tonight.”

WaPo’s Ken Adelman: “relationships are heightened and debts are deepened by State Dinner invitations.”

Rupert Murdoch may join forces with Bing and exclude Google.

The Post edit pages urges “Mayor creampuff” to not give raises to teachers.

Bloomberg defended the move of trapping straphangers in the train where a murder took place.

Metro says “Bloomberg angrily defended” the move to lock the train doors.

Jason Fink also leads with Bloomberg defending the locked-door strategy.

A Philadelphia newspaper carries the news of Bloomberg defending the closing of the D train doors after the stabbing.

British media picks up the story of “horrified passengers forced to stay” in the D train.

One cop fired 8 of the 11 shots that killed Dashawn Vasconcellos.

Clyde Haberman hears stories from veterans.

City Limits suggests ways Bloomberg can bring down homelessness.

A woman at Bloomberg’s campaign headquarters said Africans “were exercised that the campaign had not produced a separate poster for them.”

Francis Clines observes Chuck Shumer’s maple syrup strategy.

Clay Mulford, whom Bloomberg contacted about a presidential run, doesn’t have hope in a Lou Dobbs 2012 bid.

The future of three schools in Queens may be in jeopardy.

Bob Kappstatter floats three names for speaker: Al Vann, Robert Jackson and Leroy Comrie.

We’re still digesting this,” the Westchster G.O.P. chairman said of Greg Ball’s decision to run for State Senate instead of Congress.

Gatemouth: “Bill Thompson did far better in our local ‘red states’ than anyone expected, but there was a point which he could not get beyond. Perhaps the winner needed to be a Weiner.”

Fernando Cabera’s chief of staff will be Greg Faulkner.

Ouch, Newburgh.