Crime Waves: Weegee and Peanuts

2634919 Crime Waves: Weegee and PeanutsBiurny Gonzalez pleaded guilty yesterday to perjuring herself in a 2006 rape trial–prosecutors write that she had a “facile ability to look one in the eye and offer up a falsehood,” according to the Post.

Apparently, Gonzalez was fighting with her friends on the night of the attack (“yelling and hitting each other,” reports The Times) and concocted the rape story in a bid to win their sympathy. In other words, declares the Post, “Fake-Rape Gal’s Tale a Wicked Plot to Get Attention.”

The Daily News, seeking a non-”gal” synonym for “woman,” selects “mom” (“Mom ‘Fesses Up to Lying“). Gonzalez’s motherhood does not, however, appear to have had any bearing on her perjury.

In another incidence of crime and maternity, a child protection specialist who worked for the city was shot to death in the Bronx as her daughters watched. The Times goes Weegee and accompanies the story with a photo of blood on the sidewalk.

And former state Senate majority leader Joseph Bruno was convicted yesterday on two felony corruption charges, in what the Daily News calls “the guilty verdict heard ’round the state.” The case against Bruno was widely regarded as an examination of Albany’s political culture—as The Times puts it, the trial “laid bare the unseemly side of New York’s Legislature, where most lawmakers have second jobs in the private sector but are required to disclose very little about what they are paid to do.”

The Times closes its account with a snapshot of Joseph Bruno in action:

Clearly dejected, Mr. Bruno stood in the cold showing little of his trademark brio until a young woman yelled out “I love you, Joe!” as he walked toward a waiting Mercedes-Benz sedan.

“Thank you very much,” he replied.

The Daily News, for murkier reasons, ends by drawing a comparison to Charlie Brown:

The big question is whether lawmakers finally impose rigid requirements to discourage the bad behavior in the first place.

They say they will, and just as Charlie Brown trusted Lucy not to pull the football away, government reformers believe them.

Of course, she always pulled it away and Charlie always landed on his butt.