The Street Where You Live: Millionaire’s Side Row

Real estate developer Bernard Spitzer (yes, father to that Spitzer) plunked a brick-and-concrete tomb on the site of one of the ornate Brokaw mansions. Son Eliot hid out here in the days following his plummet from public grace.

J.B. Reed

Multimillionaire Isaac Vail Brokaw modeled his first mansion after a 16th-century French château. The mansion was demolished, and then supplanted by a numbingly banal apartment complex in 1965; its demolition helped advance the cause of landmark preservation law.

J.B. Reed

At the Rudolf Steiner School, the first Waldorf school in the United States, annual tuition is $29,468.

J.B. Reed

The mayor’s décor has been described as “Louis XIV on hallucinogens” and includes a George III armoire, a Fragonard sketch and a foyer paved with rare Egyptian marble.

J.B. Reed

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Mayor Bloomberg bought the first-floor apartment in 1989, the second-floor unit in 2000 and the fourth floor in 2003. Since his latest expansion in 2009, he now owns four of the townhouse’s six apartment units. On the second floor, which includes two fireplaces and a solarium, the mayor reportedly knocked down a wall to create a single unified room.

J.B. Reed

The house built by developer Charles Buek, whose opulently festooned homes for the wealthy sprouted all across the Upper East Side, was torn down and replaced with the building that now houses the private-school pizza hangout Serafina.

J.B. Reed

Mayor Bloomberg was an early supporter of the war, though whether that impacted neighborly relations is unclear. The mission long sported a large portrait of Saddam Hussein in the entranceway.

J.B. Reed

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The School of Practical Philosophy, responsible for the recent blitz of happiness promotion on the subways, is an affiliate of the London-based School of Economic Science (not to be confused with the London School of Economics).

J.B. Reed

When Sumner Ballard, the president of the International Insurance Company, died in 1942, the townhouse became a residence for the Greek Orthodox archbishop.

J.B. Reed

Frederick Gebhard, a fixture of The Times’ society column “Of Whom Clubmen Gossip,” built the house after inheriting $5 million from his father.

J.B. Reed

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In 1915, masked intruders entered the mansion of Elizabeth Nichols, a solitary, 250-pound widow. She died during the robbery.

Just a few years before his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal, oilman Harry F. Sinclair purchased the mansion from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The French Gothic mansion achieved more recent notoriety for its role as the mansion in Cruel Intentions.

J.B. Reed

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