The Week in DVR: March 3-9

gossip girl 2 giovanni ru The Week in DVR: March 3 9

Watchmen Wednesday, March 3

Last year—possibly at this very moment—you were pre-ordering IMAX tickets for Watchmen and waiting with bated breath to see the adaptation of the beloved graphic novel. What a difference a year makes! We all know how Watchmen turned out: Critics and general audiences alike met Zack Snyder’s whiz-bang film with shrugged shoulders, and not even the geeks expressed hyperbolic joy or outrage. It just kinda … exists. But regardless of its rampant mediocrity, you’d be wise to watch these Watchmen just for the opening credits, which use Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A-Changin’” and some fancy photo-realistic visuals to produce one of the best five-minute stretches of any film released in 2009. [11:45 p.m., HBO-Z]

 

The Office Thursday, March 4

Does any series do “event” episodes better than The Office? Last fall’s “Niagara” (better known to your friends as “Aww, Jim and Pam got married!”) was better than most season finales, and we’re expecting equally good things from “The Delivery.” As you can no doubt guess from the title, Jim and Pam will have their sure-to-be-adorable baby on Thursday, and though we haven’t seen it yet, we’ll go ahead and assume Michael does something horrifying/endearing to help facilitate the birth. [9 p.m., NBC]

 

Independent Spirit Awards Friday, March 5

Combining the frivolous drunkenness of the Golden Globes with the frivolous pomposity of the Oscars, the Spirit Awards feel like that last bowl of porridge Goldilocks sampled: just right. This year, the proceedings move from Saturday afternoon on Santa Monica Pier to Friday night in downtown Los Angeles, but despite the bougie venue change, we’re pretty sure the free-wheelin’ tone will remain the same; after all, Eddie Izzard is hosting (meaning the jokes should be on the R-rated side), and alcohol is still alcohol. [11 p.m., IFC]

 

The Wrestler Saturday, March 6

Speaking of the Spirit Awards … last year’s big winner, The Wrestler, is one of those movies that gets better with every viewing. Of course, Mickey Rourke’s towering performance is timeless—we’re pretty sure his Oscar loss to Sean Penn will be looked upon in 20 years with scorn and derision—but everything about Darren Aronofsky’s paean to broken dreams and the price of fame is outstanding: the script, the supporting cast and even the title song, courtesy of Bruce Springsteen. In fact, we’d go so far as to say The Wrestler is better than all the Best Picture nominees here in 2010. That it didn’t even draw a nomination last year just proves the decision to expand to 10 nominees was a smart one. [10:30 p.m., Action Max]

 

How to Make It in America Sunday, March 7

Don’t think of it as Vincent Chase: The Early Years. This new HBO series—about two 20-somethings hustling to make their dream clothing line come true—is already more enjoyable than the last few seasons of Entourage combined, because it’s a real underdog story. Plus, it takes place in New York, so if even you’re immune to America’s ample charms, you can play a drinking game based on the real-life spots the show visits. [10 p.m., HBO]

 

Gossip Girl Monday, March 8

Our long national nightmare is over! For the first time in 2010, Gossip Girl returns to the airwaves, bringing back all the soapy machinations that we know and love. If you don’t remember where the series last left off, you’re not alone. But expect to see more of the burgeoning relationship between Nate and Serena; more of the crumbling relationship between Rufus and Lily; and more of Jenny Humphrey, teenage drug mule. Fun fact: Monday’s episode has the timely benefit of being called “The Hurt Locket,” which may or may not be a good sign for those of you betting heavily on that film’s Oscar chances. [9 p.m., the CW]

 

I Love You, Man Tuesday, March 9

At this point, the term “bromance” has jumped the shark more than the term “jump the shark” itself. And yet, despite that inherent limitation, I Love You, Man proves to be a tender, sweet and very funny bromantic comedy. Much of that has to do with Jason Segel—we’d be happy to see him co-starring in every comedy ever—but don’t sleep on the contributions of Paul Rudd, who makes being nice seem like the greatest thing any guy can hope to be. [6:10 p.m., W Max]

editorial@observer.com