Number Two: Sex in The City 2 Reviews

0526satc2l 0 Number Two: Sex in The City 2 Reviews The only thing memorable about Sex and the City 2 is the number two part, which describes it totally, if you get my drift,” wrote The Observer‘s Rex Reed in his review of the film for this week’s issue.

“Sarah Jessica Parker looks better after her face mole was surgically removed,” Mr. Reed added. “So why does her hair look like 20 pounds of mattress stuffing?”

(Mr. Reed called for the removal of Ms. Parker’s mole in his review of the first Sex and the City film in 2008, writing, “There’s nothing wrong with Sarah Jessica Parker that couldn’t be cured by wart-removal surgery.”)

Mr. Reed was not the only critic to bash the new film.

The Guardian‘s Peter Bradshaw called the sequel “misjudged and quite incredibly boring” while comparing it to an old Star Trek film. 

Perhaps, with Sex and the City 4, we will be treated to a heart-rending Death of Spock-type scene, in which Samantha is fired out of a Manhattan penthouse window in a sparkly coffin, having first transferred her “katra” to a demure assistant.

Variety‘s Brian Lowry wrote that at least the film is long.

Without giving away too much regarding the story, one theme explores the boundaries of forgiveness — a touch ironic for a romantic comedy that commits the near-irredeemable sin of stretching to nearly 2 ½ hours.

Still, the women are not anywhere as desperate as the movie itself, which fails its stars and its many obsessive fans, unless everyone was waiting for the AARP version … This being a treatise on marriage, “Sex and the City”-style, the action starts stateside with a gay wedding extravaganza coupling Carrie’s GBF (Gay Best Friend, duh) Stanford (Willie Garson) to Charlotte’s GBF, Anthony (Mario Cantone) until death, or a state that doesn’t recognize gay marriage, do them part. When the question is posed, “Could this wedding get any gayer?” the filmmakers’ answer is “yes, Yes, YES!” with a Liza Minnelli capper that, like the rest of the film, sadly shows its age more than its irony