Wherein We Parry and Thrust With Governor Paterson in Penthouse of Barneys!

david paterson Wherein We Parry and Thrust With Governor Paterson in Penthouse of Barneys!“I don’t know if you saw the picture in the back of the two guys jumping up in the air,” fencer Jason Rogers asked the Transom, turning his head toward the back of the Barneys Penthouse. “These are peak, peak athletes. You don’t realize that when you watch the sport.”

Mr. Rogers and his Olympic teammate Tim Morehouse, both in gray suits, were hosting a party to raise money for Right to Play-a charity that brings sports to disadvantaged children in 23 countries-on Thursday, May 13.

They are both models, too.

“We’ve been really trying to brand our sport like Nacho Figueras has done with polo,” said Mr. Morehouse. “Both of us are with Wilhelmina.”

Like many parties these days, this one had a title: En Garde for Charity.

“I think Tim and I came up with that,” said Mr. Rogers.

The pair have been living and continuing to train in New York since winning silver medals at the Beijing Olympics.

“One of the things that fencing lends itself to is being captured by a camera,” said Mr. Rogers.

We were talking about how their athletic training helped them as models.

“Pound for pound, we are as athletic as any of the athletes out there. And in addition to that, it’s a sport that requires really intense concentration, and there’s an additional strategy component. That’s why a lot of people refer to it as ‘mental chess.'”

Somewhat incongruously, Governor Paterson was also mingling with guests. It turned out that his cousin is the COO of Right to Play.

“My father and my brother taught me to play basketball because it was the biggest ball they could find,” Governor Paterson told the Transom, licking a dollop of sauce from a drippy hors d’oeuvre off his hand. “That was when I started running. Because I found that was easier.”

Mr. Paterson told us that he plans to run the Boilermaker 15K in Utica, N.Y., this summer; an apt metaphor, perhaps, for the state’s recent cost-cutting measures.

“The reason the Boilermaker is so hard is that it’s all hills,” he said.