It’s Free to Look: 113 East 90th Street

We all know how difficult it is to find a garage in Manhattan, so if you truly want to make the neighbors jealous, why not just live in one?

This Upper East Side carriage house has undergone quite the transformation, from stables to an $11.75 million home. Fortunately for you, you won't actually be the one halling away the hay bails or cleaning out the manure. This diminutive spot has already been converted into the avant-garde Allan Stone gallery, meaning your most daunting task may be filling in the paint hooks. 

In exchange for your trouble, you'll not only be able to taunt your neighbors with having one of the few two-car garages in the area. You'll also have a couple of other rare amenities -- a courtyard and a guest cottage, according to the Warburg listing.

Now you can only hope your charming new home with the fairytale transformation doesn't turn back into a pumpkin at the stroke of midnight. -- Laura Kusisto

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carriagehouse Its Free to Look: 113 East 90th Street We all know how difficult it is to find a garage in Manhattan, so if you truly want to make the neighbors jealous, why not just live in one?

This Upper East Side carriage house has undergone quite the transformation, from stables to an $11.75 million home. Fortunately for you, you won’t actually be the one halling away the hay bails or cleaning out the manure. This diminutive spot has already been converted into the avant-garde Allan Stone gallery, meaning your most daunting task may be filling in the paint hooks.

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