Storms A-Brewin'! Time Inc. Employees, Moor Your Boats

0901boats Storms A Brewin'! Time Inc. Employees, Moor Your BoatsThe Time Inc. Business Continuity Group (that exists) sent out a memo to the entire staff this afternoon with some tips about how to stay safe during Hurricane Earl, which is heading our way generally. Nobody is really safe.

Bring your lightweight objects inside! If you own a boat, moor it! If you go into your refrigerator, close the door quickly. “Consider developing a disaster plan.” Also, continue with business as usual.

Here’s the memo:

September 1, 2010
 
To:       Time Inc. New York Emploeyes
From:   Time Inc. Business Continuity Group
Re:       Hurricane Safety Tips
 
As you may be aware, Hurricane Earl is expected to pass along the east coast of the United States at the end of the week. Although forecasts do not predict a direct hit to New York City, the NYC area may experience some heavy rain and strong winds. Time Inc. is encouraging all employees in the NYC area especially in the coastal areas to be alert and prepared.  

Before the Storm:

Stay Informed
For the latest information about an approaching storm, stay tuned to TV and radio broadcasts, access NYC.gov, or call 311. Before a hurricane, residents should find out whether they live in one of New York City’s hurricane evacuation zones. Those in an evacuation zone will have to follow special procedures if a hurricane seems likely to make landfall near the City. Learn more about hurricane evacuation.

Protect Yourself and Your Property
If a tropical storm or hurricane watch is issued, take steps to ensure your property is safe.

  • Bring inside loose, lightweight objects, such as lawn furniture, garbage cans, garden tools, and toys.
  • Anchor objects that will be unsafe to bring inside, like gas grills or propane tanks. Turn off propane tanks.
  • Shutter windows securely and brace outside doors.
  • Place valuables in waterproof containers or plastic bags.
  • Prepare to be self-sufficient for at least three days without help or emergency services. Prepare a Go Bag  and an Emergency Supply Kit.
  • Assume that many of the streets and stores in your neighborhood will be closed. A watch may be followed by disruptions to electricity, gas, water or telephone service.
  • If you own a vehicle, fill your gas tank. If you own a boat, moor or move it to a safe place well before the storm causes maritime conditions to deteriorate. If you own a mobile home/trailer, tie it down securely.
  • Take out extra cash

Help Others Prepare

  • Check on friends, relatives and neighbors, especially those with disabilities or special needs and assist them with their preparation, if possible.
  • Contact family members outside your household to coordinate and inform each other about preparations. Avoid separating your immediate family. Consider developing a disaster plan.

Prepare for Water and Sewer Disruptions

  • To keep perishable food cold, freeze water in plastic jugs and use in freezer or coolers. Fill up other emergency water containers.
  • Clean jugs, bottles and other containers. Scrub bathtubs thoroughly, sponge and swab with regular, unscented liquid chlorine bleach, then rinse. Let the tub and other containers dry. Fill with water.
  • If you have a pool, do not drain it completely. Instead, drop the level by one or two feet. Submerge outdoor furniture and pool equipment in the pool. Turn off electricity to pool pump. Add extra chlorine to compensate for heavy rains.
  • Keep five-gallon buckets with tight-fitting lids for use as emergency toilets. Line each bucket with a heavy-duty plastic trash bag
  • Learn more about food supply preparation for an emergency.

Prepare for Power Disruptions

  • Do not use candles or kerosene lamps as light sources, as they can pose a fire hazard. Instead, keep a supply of flashlights and extra batteries on hand.
  • Turn your refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings. Open only when absolutely necessary, then close quickly.
  • In the event that you need to evacuate your home, unplug appliances to prevent damage in case of an electrical power surge.