Money laundering and “investing in death,” Dwek twisting on the stand

 

NEWARK – Forget indicted Ridgefield Mayor Anthony Suarez, his attorney has turned the spotlight of truth and justice back on F.B.I. informant Solomon Dwek today.

Suarez is on trial for allegedly accepting a $10,000 in bribes for zoning approvals, and since his arrest Suarez has been reconfirmed as mayor by the electorate in an August recall election.

His case is interesting among the 44 arrests made last year – not only because Suarez never ceded his office – Suarez, a young attorney and promising political lieutenant in Bergen County, gave himself outs.

He distanced himself from the bribery – “They’re separate things,” the money and the construction approvals, Suarez told Dwek.  He never accepted the cash nor did he cash the check written to him for Dwek’s money – just enough for him to stand trial with a shot at walking away.

Today, Dwek is on trial.

Suarez’s attorney hammered at the government’s cooperating witness who was videotaped attempting to bribe the mayor into fast tracking his development deal, attempting to paint Dwek as a con-man and a criminal.

 

Dwek said he engaged in numerous illegal activities, including a life insurance scam he ran with Chaskie Rosenberg, a former insurance rep.

Suarez’ attorney Michael Critchley asked Dwek, “(Rosenberg) knew people who were in ill health and were dying? You would invest in these people’s deaths?”

“Me, him, and the family,” Dwek said, noting that the family only collects 10 percent.

“How many times did you invest in somebody’s death?” Critchley asked.

Ten times, Dwek said.

Critchley: “Kind of diabolical?”

Objection.

“Kind of sleazy?”

“Yeah,” Dwek said.

In other money laundering schemes, Dwek and associates used fake charities to write-off tax breaks.

“They have no bricks and mortar. They have no congregation,” Dwek said.

They turned a yeshiva in Monmouth County into a “cash house.”

“It was a place of education, you turned it into a crime scene,” Critchley posed.

Dwek said, “Correct.”

“You basically destroyed that institution,” again Critchley hammered.

“Unfortunately,” Dwek said.

<!–[if gte mso 10]>

NEWARK – Forget indicted Ridgefield Mayor Anthony Suarez, his attorney has turned the spotlight of truth and justice back on F.B.I. informant Solomon Dwek today.

Suarez is on trial for allegedly accepting a $10,000 in bribes for zoning approvals, and since his arrest Suarez has been reconfirmed as mayor by the electorate in an August recall election.

His case is interesting among the 44 arrests made last year – not only because Suarez never ceded his office – Suarez, a young attorney and promising political lieutenant in Bergen County, gave himself outs.

He distanced himself from the bribery – “They’re separate things,” the money and the construction approvals, Suarez told Dwek.  He never accepted the cash nor did he cash the check written to him for Dwek’s money – just enough from him to stand trial with a shot at walking away.

Today, Dwek is on trial.

Suarez’s attorney hammered at the government’s cooperating witness who was videotaped attempting to bribe the mayor into fast tracking his development deal, attempting to paint Dwek as a con-man and a criminal.

In response, Dwek listed details of money laundering schemes, tax evasion, and insurance fraud.

Dwek said he engaged in numerous illegal activities, including a life insurance scam he ran with Chaskie Rosenberg, a former insurance rep.

Suarez’ attorney John Michael Vazquez asked Dwek, “(Rosenberg) knew people who were in ill health and were dying? You would invest in these people’s deaths?”

“Me, him, and the family,” Dwek said, noting that the family only collects 10 percent.

“How many times did you invest in somebody’s death?” Vazquez asked.

Ten times, Dwek said.

Vazquez: “Kind of diabolical?”

Objection.

“Kind of sleazy?”

“Yeah,” Dwek said.

In other money laundering schemes, Dwek and associates used fake charities to write-off tax breaks.

“They have no bricks and mortar. They have no congregation,” Dwek said.

They turned a yeshiva in Monmouth County into a “cash house.”

“It was a place of education, you turned it into a crime scene,” Vazquez posed.

Dwek said, “Correct.”

“You basically destroyed that institution,” again Vazquez hammered.

“Unfortunately,” Dwek said.

 <–>