Morning Roundup: We Need You Now, Elizabeth Warren!

  • This whole foreclosure crisis really makes you think, “Why is there never a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau around when you need one?” [TheStreet.com]
  • The loss of value to bank companies like Wells Fargo, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America totaled $49 billion over the past three days, because investors truly are concerned about the effects of the foreclosure crisis. [Bloomberg]
  • Sick of all the risk inherent in trying to maximize their returns as though they were super hedge funds, many pension funds are turning away from stocks and toward bonds. [WSJ]
  • AIG is cutting off major funds from access to the initial public offering of shares in AIA, its giant Asian life insurance unit, because AIA is just so darn popular. [Reuters]
  • Chicago Federal Reserve president Charles Evans says the U.S. is in a “liquidity trap,” which when you think about it should much easier to escape than a “solidity trap.” [FT]

mtaylor [at] observer.com | @mbrookstaylor

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