Designer Menorahs

  • The menorah, designed exclusively for the Jewish Museum, details the travails of the Jewish people throughout history, with each candle holder representing a different disaster, such as the expulsion from Britain and France at left and the Russian pogroms and the Holocaust at right. The menorah costs $1,000, though it's only $900 for members. (Available at: Jewish Museum)

  • Not rich enough for you? How about this limited edition menorah, also from the Jewish Museum, which was designed by artist and Holocaust survivor Manfred Anson to commemorate the Statue of Liberty's centennial. It costs $10,000 and is the perfect mix of Americana and Judaica. Bonus: the base lists important dates from the fight for the foundation of Israel. Am Yisrael Chai! (Jewish Museum)

  • A replica of this classic by the Spanish surrealist runs $24,500, and—how's this for surreal?—is not even suitable for Chanukah because it only has seven candle holders. (Genesis Gallery)

  • ...we can do that. It's been discontinued, but here is Tiffany's all-silver menorah from a few years back. It was actually more affordable than one might expect, only $2,800. (Tiffany's)

  • How about this fashionable model. This sculpture was created by artist Michael Levy as a commentary on the consumerist nature of the winter holidays. On his website, he writes: "We already have torah yads (the pointers used to touch the torah so as not to damage it) made of silver, why can't they be Tiffany's?"

  • For something more affordable, pink-preferring designer and bon vivant Karim Rashid has made this extraterestial-looking number for $50. (Jewish Museum)

  • For those looking for cool yet affordable, this model comes from everyone's favorite IKEA-upgrade and only costs $32. (Crate & Barrel)

  • Jersey-born, New York-based decor maven Jonathan Adler does a new menorah every year. This is the 2010 addition, a peacock. (Jonatahn Adler, $120)

  • The Observer is partial to the 2007 model, called "The Skyline." (Jonathan Adler, $125)

  • Just love the green one.

  • For something a little more Uptown, this menorah comes from Park Avenue's own Simon Pearce. It features a polished metal candleholder set into a block of hand-blown glass. (Contemporary Concepts, $325)

  • The American artist is best known for his serving pieces, but he also does holiday goods, including this menorah modeled on Noah's Ark. A little literal for The Observer's taste. (Michael Aram, $159)

  • Live in a South Burg loft and really want to impress your Satmar neighbors? Grab this cast-iron menorah from the cutting-edge design collective Areaware. (Velocity, $150)

  • His "Wisteria Menorah" is a little more to our liking. (Michael Aram, $170)

  • This menorah is the work of Israeli artist Rory Hooper. It doubles as a Shabbat candle holder, for a year-round value that looks cool, too. If you haven't figured it out yet, you put the Chanukah candles in any of those holes. (Jewish Museum, $265)

  • Another customizable Israeli entry, this menorah is made from small concrete blocks. (Jewish Museum, $285)

  • This clever menorah by a pair of Israeli industrial designers is made from cast-off Shabbat candlesticks. Since a pair is required to light the candles each week, one is a waste. Consider this Jewish recycling. (Not for sale.)

  • The blocks can be arrayed any number of ways.

  • Possibly the ultimate designer-cool statement: A reproduction of a 1930s menorah made by Bauhaus designer David Gumbel, just three years before Hitler shutdown the renowned art and architecture school. (Jewish Museum, $300)