Does Net Queen Mary Meeker’s Return Herald Tech Boom (or Bubble)?

mary meeker Does Net Queen Mary Meekers Return Herald Tech Boom (or Bubble)?Back in the late 1990s, Morgan Stanley analyst Mary Meeker was known as the “Net Queen” for her bullish view on the web. When the Dot-com bubble burst, of course, her research fell out of favor.

But according to Bloomberg, a decade later, with tech stocks all the rage, Meeker’s research is back in style. “We are trying to invest in the kinds of companies she’ll mention in her reports,” uber-hip investor Marc Andreessen told Bloomberg.

Meeker’s bullish call these days is mobile. She is expected to forecast a $50 billion online advertising boom in an address at the annual Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco, with mobile commerce the sector she believes will lead the charge.

This is truly a second coming for Meeker. From Bloomberg,

Meeker fared better than analysts such as Henry Blodget, formerly of Merrill Lynch & Co., who was fined and banned for life from the securities industry; the SEC didn’t accuse Meeker of wrongdoing. Still, then-New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who led the probe by state and federal authorities, said Morgan Stanley failed to supervise its analysts, including Meeker, and said the company inadequately managed conflicts of interest between its research and investment-banking divisions.

Of course, Blodget isn’t doing so bad for himself, having built a small web empire over at Business Insider, which he recently celebrated with a party on the floor of the NYSE.

The irony of a man banned for life from analyzing technology stocks celebrating his booming business blogging about technology companies on the floor of the stock exchange was surely not lost on this once and future Queen.

These two tech pundits also share a particular passion: slide shows. Business Insider is chock full of them. And according to Bloomberg,

This year marks the seventh-straight year Meeker is speaking at the Web 2.0 conference. She packs a lot into her 10- minute presentation, said John Battelle, executive producer of the Web 2.0 Summit. Last year, she plowed through 75 slides in the time most presenters to cover a dozen, he said. “The funny thing about Mary is, every year, she tries to deliver more slides in the same amount of time,” Battelle said. “She may have mellowed a little bit over the years, but not much.”

bpopper [at] observer.com | @benpopper