The Year’s Biggest Media Launches (Such as They Are)

The New York Times has its Weddings & Celebrations pages, so why can't someone have a vertical dedicated to that institution's inevitable demise? The Huffington Post tapped Nora Ephron to head up its new divorce section, and so far she hasn't turned it into a referendum on her failed marriage to Carl Berstein. But there's still time yet!

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The New York Times added 12 staffers to its DealBook title in June, more than doubling the numbers at Andrew Ross Sorkin's popular finance-news blog. And in November, a redesign of the site released upon the world the new percentage sign-studded "DealB%k" logo. Classy!

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Vulture.com, the new home for New York's extraordinarily thorough entertainment blog, came about in September. New York's Adam Moss has said he expects the magazine to become profitable next year; if that comes to pass, the new Vulture.com may be a part of what makes it happen. 

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Former Observer editors Tom McGeveran and Josh Benson launched Capital -- an "earnest editorial effort" as opposed to one of those "rapid-fire blogs," -- early this summer. Among the site's notable features: "crazy" freelance rates!

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The Awl, the much-loved site from Gawker alumni Alex Balk and Choire Sicha (also a former Observer editor and columnist), announced it would launch two new blogs to accompany its flagship site. Publisher David Cho broke news of the plans to Nieman Journalism Lab in June. By September, Splitsider went live with ex-Gizmodo scribe Adam Frucci at the helm, and October saw the advent of The Hairpin, a "ladies website" run by Edith Zimmerman. Will this budding empire grow in 2011?

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Rupert Murdoch continued his makeover of The Wall Street Journal with a general interest-y eye-catching weekend section that debuted in September. They even got Jay McInerney to do his thing for the launch!

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Conde Nast shuttered its longstanding cuisine property last year, but in June revealed its master plan for reviving it: an iPad app! Gourmet became Gourmet Live in September, when it was released in tablet form. It even featured that thing where David Foster Wallace considers the lobster!

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Mediagazer was launched in March by Megan McCarthy, the first human editor of Techmeme. The concept makes sense for her -- it's like Techmeme, but with media -- but McCarthy takes the extra step to make sure that a discerning eye spices up the selections and adds to the stories that the algorithm chooses. That combination has made Mediagazer an enjoyable must-read for anybody in the business.

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In January, 26-year-old Andrew Golis announced that he would be hiring editors and bloggers to work at the network of news sites he would be running for Yahoo. The news initiated the ancient-seeming Internet behemoth's transition to reporting and aggregation, and as the months progressed many writers disappeared into the maw. In November, Yahoo announced its newest additions to its burgeoning blog network: The Ticket, The Lookout, and The Cutline, all of which are operating under the umbrella news blog, The Upshot.

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Rupert Murdoch has a seemingly infinite amount of money, so when a journalistic venture catches his fancy he splurges. These days he's all about The Daily, the first publication created specifically for the iPad. Though technically not launching until early 2011, the massive project has been scooping up reporters from all over New York and elsewhere, and everyone is talking about the thing. He's roped off a floor in the News Corp. building and chosen the one-time presumed New York Post heir apparent Jesse Angelo to head it up. Will Steve Jobs be there standing next to Rupert when it's introduced?

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