WSJ vs. T: Sunday Glossy Scorecard

  • Both mags' coverboys are riding a wave of hype-by-proxy—Vincent Cassel (left) from Oscar-darling Black Swan and Mick Jagger from the rash of Stones' publicity surrounding Keith Richards' memoir. Vincent Cassel is the better pick, in our opinion, but the obvious power pose, white backdrop, and big W in the corner are a little "Men's Warehouse Circular." Jagger is pretty irresistably boyish and a tougher get.

    Winner: T

  • We had hoped Singer would come with a few visual tweaks for the notoriously unreadable T, but, alas, the text remains miniscule and the "Remix" section is still perplexing. WSJ, however, is gorgeous. Wide pages, justified columns, and panoramic photo spreads make it a treat to read (or flip through, anyway). Has it always looked this good? 

    Winner: WSJ

  • Singer's Rolodex is all over T—Chloe Sevigny, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Freja Beha, Sasha Pivovarova, Mila Kunis—and it's impressive. But we're not sure we can forgive Singer this blunder: She interviews model Sasha Pivovarova about her art and merely photographs genius Nicki Minaj in a cute dress. D'oh. Needleman, by contrast, gives moguls Michael Eisner and Warren Buffett space to write in the first person. Original, but a little dull and pandery.

    Winner: T

  • Noah Feldman, Harvard prof and Middle East expert, is the WSJ's big features draw, but his travel piece on Beirut is, if lucid and informative, surprisingly clinical. It's almost unfair to compare it to Zoe Heller's delightful Mick Jagger profile. A highlight is Jagger's totally normal-sounding account of his relationship with Marianne Faithfull.

    Winner: T

  • Singer's T is still the better Sunday morning read, but who knows for how long? Needleman has structured a great magazine, and with Murdoch money and a few more crack freelancers, literally anything is possible. Until next time!

  • WSJ has a spread of Vincent Cassel looking dapper and amorous all over Paris, and it's predictable fun. Their editorial is a little more inspired—clean-lined resort wear paired with Sol LeWitt paintings—but doesn't hold a candle to Singer's technicolor-alien-gangsters spring collections preview. A second T editorial shot by Alice O'Malley adds depth

    Winner: T

  • Needleman did not forget how to pull of a home design spread after Bo-Bo home living title Domino shuttered. WSJ's piece on Roxy Music frontman Bryan Ferry's pastel Chelsea pad is warmer and more natural than Times' visit to art widow Corice Arman's home. Visual pieces on building a garden in the Loire Valley and a remote Japanese art haven show off the breadth of Needleman's design expertise.

    Winner: WSJ