The New Yorker Discovers That The Most Interesting Man In The World Isn't Acting

most interesting man 240 The New Yorker Discovers That The Most Interesting Man In The World Isn't ActingBefore a certain series of ads started to pop up during football games and prime-time TV, if someone didn’t drink beer, they probably didn’t drink Dos Equis.

The imbibing habits of one man may have changed that. Dubbed “The Most Interesting Man In The World,” actor Jonathan Goldsmith has been doling out faux-macho advice, always coupled with a narrator sufficiently justifying the hyperbolic tagline. His much-loved slogan in these ads — “I don’t always drink beer, but when I do, I prefer Dos Equis” — is one of the reasons a spokesperson claims that the company is the fastest-growing imported beers in the country.

But who is Jonathan Goldsmith? The New Yorker‘s Nick Paumgarten met up with the man during a brief stay in the city (he usually lives on a boat in Marina del Rey) and found him to be, well, interesting.

Goldsmith is not this man. Still, he has more in common with him than you do. A montage of highlights from the real life of Jonathan Goldsmith might include (had there been cameras present) footage of him rescuing a stranded climber on Mt. Whitney, saving a drowning girl in Malibu, sailing the high seas with his friend Fernando Lamas (the inspiration for his Interesting persona and, according to Goldsmith, “the greatest swordsman who ever lived in Hollywood”), and starting a successful network marketing business (“I was a hustler, a very good hustler”), which, for a while, anyway, enabled him to flee Hollywood for an estate in the Sierras. Among the outtakes might be glimpses of his stint as a waterless-car-wash entrepreneur. “I love the old philosophers,” he said. “I have a large library. I am not a die-hard sports fan. I love to cut wood.”

The piece is quick and charming, as the best Talk of the Town pieces are, and it gives the veteran character actor a chance to step out from the outsized personality that may very well come to define him. It’s nice context to have whenever one of the ubiquitous ads come on.

Speaking of which, let’s revist a classic of the form. Stay thirsty, my friends.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Bc0WjTT0Ps&feature=mfu_in_order&list=UL

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nfreeman [at] observer.com | @nfreeman1234