New York Times: Bloomberg's Plan Is 'Almost Unintelligibly Complex'

The New York Times editorial this morning has some harsh words for Mayor Bloomberg’s plan to change teacher seniority rules, calling it “almost unintelligibly complex.” Evidence of that is in their news pages, where a seemingly hard-working teacher is, based on the evaluation system, going to be shoved out the door.

But the paper does outline what they’d like to see in a final piece of legislation:

The Legislature must make sure that the scoring system weighs student performance most heavily, so that unfit teachers aren’t allowed to remain on the job by performing well in peripheral areas. Finally, the Legislature must place reasonable limits on the time that teachers can spend appealing unfavorable ratings.

And, for whatever it’s worth, I’d note one other critique: The Times editorial page uses the word “objective” to describe the criteria by which teachers should be measured, whereas Bloomberg is using the word “subjective.”

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