Bloomberg Thinks He Will Stay Out of 2012 Presidential Race

michael bloomberg barack obamajpg 36e3008ab4fa35a2 medium Bloomberg Thinks He Will Stay Out of 2012 Presidential RaceMayor Mike Bloomberg was asked today if he plans to support Barack Obama’s re-election bid.

His answer? Unsure, but probably not.

“I don’t know,” he said. “It’s a long time away. Last time I stayed out of the national election because the mayor has to work with whoever gets elected.”

The mayor then headed any charges of hyporcrisy by noting that yes, last year he did endorse Andrew Cuomo.

“I did get involved in all fairness in the governor’s race,” he said.  “And you can say why one and not the other. That’s a little bit easier, it’s closer to home. I’ve been a long time friend of Andrew Cuomo.”

The mayor then veered into some high praise of Cuomo (even though the two of have been sparring as of late over the budget) saying, “I think he’ll be a great governor. I think so far he’s done a great job. I am not always happy with some of his decisions you never going to be, because he represents 18 million people and I represent 8 million people,” before saying that, despite Obama doing a decent job, he doesn’t think that he will make an endorsement.

When it comes to The President, I am not surprised he is going to run. I think he is very proud of what he has accomplished in the first two years. Nobody ever said it was going to be easy. Congress is pretty much divided. The country is upset because of a lot of things, some of which started many years ago. I think we all hope whether we want to have President Obama continue for another four years or not, we all hope that President Obama is a great president for the next two years. He is the president of our country and our future depends on his leadership and I will do anything I can to help him and probably stay out of the race. But I don’t think it’s a big surprise that he is running.

In 2010, the mayor made a number of high-profile endorsements, primarily for centrists who he believed were trying to fend off Tea Party challengers.  There remains a decent chance that a Tea Partier, or at least a Tea Party-approved Republican, wins the G.O.P. nomination.