Google This! Experian Hitwise in Rockrose’s 300 Park South

300parksouth Google This! Experian Hitwise in Rockroses 300 Park SouthNothing feeds our procrastination habit like Experian Hitwise‘s dissections of Internet searchitude. (What does the fact that the term “royal wedding” was five times more popular than “NFL draft” in the last few weeks say about the modern male?) 

But, for your sake dear reader, we’ll tear ourselves away long enough to report that the online marketing research firm has in fact renewed it 13,000-square-foot lease at Rockrose‘s 300 Park Avenue South for five years

Perhaps Hitwise, which has 15,000 employees around the globe, was so busy tracking Internet searches that it had no time to search for new space of its own. But more likely they’ve managed to score themselves a spot in one of the city’s most talked-about towers, a recently minted centurion no less. Eight floors have been taken in building in the last eight months, including space leased by the Whitney and the Leo Burnett Ad Agency. 

In this deal, John Peters, Andy Peretz and Mikael Nahmias of Cushman & Wakefield represented the landlord; Paul Formichelli of Jones Lang LaSalle represented the tenant. Asking rents in the building are around $50 a foot, according to CoStar.com. 

lkusisto@observer.com

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