The Home Observer: Go Fishs

Julie Gaines and David Lenovitz, the owners of iconic dishware emporium Fishs Eddy, at home in Battery Park. They fit their interior perfectly: Fashion is not their thing, but they do have a look.

Raeanne Giovanni-Inoue

Gaines and Lenovitz live with their two now teenage children in the three-bedroom duplex on the top floor of a riverfront high-rise.

Raeanne Giovanni-Inoue

Julie Gaines describes their home décor as "authentic, eclectic and curated." Here, a white cake stand holds sculptures by Gaines.

Raeanne Giovanni-Inoue

The living room is also a dining room and home office: it's decorated with paintings, throw pillows, and many knick-knacks.

Raeanne Giovanni-Inoue

Every surface in the apartment is home to collections of interesting tchotchkes, also collected over decades. "There's no system in our home," said Ms. Gaines, and even though there is so much diversity in the place, it all hangs together since the "decorators" are true to their aesthetic and never deviate; sleek and modern does not sneak in.

Raeanne Giovanni-Inoue

That which does not fit in the apartment lives in storage in New Jersey; here, collections in the warehouse.

Raeanne Giovanni-Inoue

Dishware pattern designed by Todd Oldham, available at Fishs Eddy.

Courtesy Fishs Eddy

Fishs Eddy, at 889 Broadway (19th Street). Over the past 25 years, the vintage dishware and kitchen accouterments Gaines and Lenovitz sell have become highly sought after by all sorts of New Yorkers, including Julian Schnabel who, according to Ms. Gaines and Mr. Lenovitz, not only bought plates but smashed them to pieces to glue onto his well-known paintings.

Courtesy Fishs Eddy

Glassware designed by Patrick Hruby, available at Fishs Eddy.

Courtesy Fishs Eddy