Andy Warhol App Deemed Not The Best

The Andy Warhol Museum, having just named a new director, released the Andy Warhol D.I.Y. Pop app today, which allows app-happy Warhol fans to create their own works from the comfort of their iPhones. We decided to give it a spin and see how it stacks up against other apps that allow you to create mimicking works of art. Ranked from “the best” to “terrible,” they are:

The Best “Jackson Pollock” by Miltos Manetas

photo5 Andy Warhol App Deemed Not The BestThe artist Miltos Manetas presents this not-too-shabby app that allows you to drip like a champ, and even creates brush droplets when you lift your finger. We daresay we’re just a fingerprint short of passing this off as an authentic Pollock (Joke! Don’t sue!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just Okay/Sorry, What? In Still Life by John Baldessari

instill Andy Warhol App Deemed Not The BestJohn Baldessari created the original In Still Life for a LACMA show in 2011, which invited visitors to rearrange the 38 objects in Abraham van Beyeren’s Banquet Still Life. The app was of a similar theme (example to the left courtesy Asuka Hisa), but somewhat underwhelming without the museum context. But it’s also not available anymore, so it has that going for it. What? There are too many apps!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terrible “Andy Warhol D.I.Y. Pop” by The Andy Warhol Museum

photo42 Andy Warhol App Deemed Not The BestYou had this in the bag Andy Warhol D.I.Y. Pop app. This post was about you, and we even used the most Warholian thing on our desk (that Vanity Fair picture of Gwyneth Paltrow from the Post last week) but you still couldn’t seal the deal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo3 Andy Warhol App Deemed Not The BestShe looks like the Joker. And why is she not repeated at least four times? Why is she not already valuable? In the future everyone will buy the Andy Warhol D.I.Y. Pop app, and delete it after 15 minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So of the two that are still available for purchase, The Observer recommends the Pollock one, sort of.