Windsor Knot: The Poor Man's Park Slope

prospectpark1 Windsor Knot: The Poor Man's Park Slope

Windsor Knot is around the corner.

The latest in our series on the neighborhoods of New York.

Windsor Knot: It’s Knot Park Slope. How’s that for a slogan?

“I like this area because it’s generally pretty quiet and it feels different from Park Slope,” said 43-year-old music teacher Pete Heitmann of the neighborhood at the convergence of Windsor Terrace, Prospect Park and Kensington. “People have been more rooted here for a longer time so there’s an old neighborhood feel.”

Windsor Knot is like the less pretentious (and less expensive) version of the Slope. Maybe not quite as upscale and trendy as that redoubt of the carefully hip, with its high-end boutiques and pricey restaurants, but still a good place to raise the kids. And, indeed, we did pass a lot of strollers and family picnics on our walk through the area. It’s a nice slice of suburbia in the City That Never Sleeps.

“It’s a good place for families,” said Alexandra Poshtaruk, a 25-year-old medical technology student. “There’s more space, lots of parks, good schools.” She pointed out another upside for fans of the all-American family: “You can take your dog anywhere.”

Ms. Poshtaruk also noted the influx of “yuppies and hipsters”—sound familiar?

Speaking of, we also ran into a 33-year-old Kensington resident who works for a literary agency. He was reading on a Prospect Park bench. He, too, noted the reasonable prices and open space of Windsor Knot, but… “The one thing I don’t like about this area is there aren’t a lot of great restaurants,” said Aaron Rich, who has lived in Kensington for four years, but was previously accustomed to Manhattan’s plethora of dining options.

Despite noting the less exciting lifestyle Windsor Knot has to offer, everyone we talked to said they appreciated the quiet and calm of the neighborhood. Mr. Heitmann told us: “Some days I definitely wish for the vibrancy of Manhattan, but other days I’m thankful for the peace of mind this part of town provides.”

pengel@observer.com

Comments

  1. Manhattist, Inc. says:

    This is why we tend to pitch properties in places like the Upper West Side to our clients—Riverside Park offers people a respite while simultaneously allowing the hip professional access to work and everything the City has to offer. The young up-and-coming apartment-seeker couldn’t ask for a better arrangement. Places like Windosr Knot are definitely nice, but you do sacrifice a lot when not in the thick of things in Manhattan. We believe in transparency, and we want our clients to know these things.

    –Manhattist, Inc.

    1. Anonymous says:

      If you believe in transparency, you would have said it’s because you collect a hell of a lot more commission for pushing Manhattan properties! The point of the article is that is much less expensive to live here (Windsor Terrace) and I’m a block from Prospect Park. Easy acces to Park Slope, Cobble Hill and Manhattan.

    2. Anonymous says:

      If you believe in transparency, you would have said it’s because you collect a hell of a lot more commission for pushing Manhattan properties! The point of the article is that is much less expensive to live here (Windsor Terrace) and I’m a block from Prospect Park. Easy acces to Park Slope, Cobble Hill and Manhattan.

    3. Anonymous says:

      Who gives a shit what you pitch?  And apparently you’re a real estate broker, so transparency is the last thing you’re interested in.  You rank below used car salesman and septic tank cleaner in just about everybody’s book.

  2. apasta says:

    This article is very light on details. What are the boundaries of ‘windsor knot’? What separates it from windsor terrace proper? I live in the general area and have never once heard anyone use the name ‘windsor knot’

  3. Andy says:

    No such neighborhood exists.  I lived in Park Slope for almost a decade and now live in Windsor Terrace and I have never, ever heard the term “Windsor Knot” once.  Sorry, but this is kind of stupid.

  4. Anonymous says:

    The convergence of these three neighborhoods is…the two neighborhoods (WT, Kensington), and the Park. There’s no third neighborhood. Stop trying to make “fetch” happen.

  5. Shywitegrl says:

    Windsor Terrace is now equal in price to Park Slope, parking (they should really call it CAN’T Park Slope) is a daily battle yet for the same housing costs of Park Slope, Windsor TERRACE lacks the services despite the proximity.  Try to get a restaurant to deliver below Terrace Place – a decent one anyway.  Regarding the reference to the name “Windsor Knot” it’s a lot like “Greenwood Heights”  – it’s the beginning of Sunset Park and dressing it up with any descriptive word is not going to change that!