Are Your Design Skills Worthy of This East Hampton Classic?

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According to the listing maintained (quite proprietorially, it seems) by Corcoran SVP Elaine Stimmel, this Georgica Road six-bedroom, 6.5-bath has been put on the market by “a successful duo in the world of interior design.”

And while the photos clearly show a home that is a “feast for the eyes,” indeed, The Observer has to wonder if this listing isn’t also a bit of an HGTV-style decorating challenge for any potential buyer. A challenge which would cost that new owner $5 million for the privilege (we’ll round up $5K on the asking price to make it a cool $5 million).

Not that we’re saying the house doesn’t have its charms—classic wood-shingled exterior, beautiful pool in what seems to be a spacious yard, and a prestigious Hamptons location—but we do think it’s fair to say that whoever pays the price after seeing the current decor is also making a statement about their confidence in their own aesthetic.

tmcenery@observer.com

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