Good Morning! Creative Thinking Edition

German senior citizens, in increasing numbers, are taking classes to learn how to create graffiti. “Graffiti is an activity that requires a lot of movement, like bending and stretching,” one geriatrics research assistant said. “It can also potentially strengthen hand-eye coordination.” [Spiegel Online]

The Independent profiles Gregory Muir, the new head of London’s Institute of Contemporary Art, which has been struggling with budgetary issues in recent years. Mr. Muir, a former director at the powerful Hauser & Wirth gallery, is looking for private backers to help shore up the storied institution’s finances. [The Independent]

Katya Kazakina profiles the 39-year-old Brooklyn-based artist Luis Gispert, who will show at the Mary Boone Gallery in September. Mr. Gispert has been photographing cars outfitted with glorious, ridiculous designer fabrics, and printing the images to scale. “When you are inside the Burberry car, it’s like you are driving in a giant purse,” he said. The images, printed in editions of six, are selling for $25,000 a piece. [Bloomberg]

Dutch artist Theo Jansen, who works in Delft–the relatively modest city where the 17th-century painter Vermeer spent his life–has devoted more than two decades to constructing animals that he calls Strandbeests–“beach animals” in Dutch–that can move along the beach, powered only by the wind. Subscription required. [The New Yorker]

The legendary Magnum Photos agency, which is owned by MSD Capital, the investment fund of computer entrepreneur Michael Dell that is run by art collector Glenn R. Fuhrman, is working with a company called Tagasauris to build a Wikipedia-style model for tagging and cataloguing Magnum’s voluminous archive of photos. Fifty lucky volunteers have been selected to add tags to the archive. Their compensation: early access to the photo archives. [Le Monde via Artforum]

Correction: This article has been changed to note that MSD Capital purchased a substantial selection of the former Magnum New York press print library, not the agency itself, which is owned by the photographer-members. In addition, the 50 volunteers are responsible for adding tags to the archive, not just confirming them.