A fascinating new documentary that’s shot from the dictator’s POV

Harun Farocki and Andrei Ujica made Videograms of a Revolution, their fascinating found-footage documentary about Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceauşescu, in 1992. Now Ujica has made a presequel—The Autobiography of Nicolae Ceauşescu—that shows us Ceauşescu’s regime through the dictator’s own eyes. (In limited release tomorrow. You can watch Videograms, in its entirety, by clicking on the link below.)

The 1992 film was compiled from state broadcasts and previously unseen footage by amateurs and television journalists; it captured a revolution unfolding in real time. The Autobiography gathers footage shot by the dictator’s personal cameramen—but as the Ceauşescu regime begins to collapse, and his story starts losing its shape, events taking place offscreen begin to seep into the margins. The result is a precious historical document, and a genuine work of art.

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A fascinating new documentary that’s shot from the dictator’s POV