Inbox Heroes: 10 Startups Tackling Email Overload

  • Around December 1964, researchers at the MIT Computation Center sent a memo to the programming staff. “A new command should be written to allow a user to send a private message to another user which may be delivered at the receiver’s convenience,” the note read. Flash forward 45 years, and our inboxes are flooded. Expedia has a 24-hour travel deal. The New Yorkerwould like you to renew your subscription. Your friend is writing with tears in her eyes that she’s in Paris and has been robbed and would you please send money. Facebook wants you to know that someone liked something you wrote a week ago. Your cousin sent the extended family a link to a video of an a cappella group rapping about Hanukkah.

    Email! There is now so much of it, and more is being created all the time. It’s always open in a tab; it’s on our phones. Fortunately, VCs are having the same problem–and they’re throwing money at it. Check out these 10 startups trying to fix email.

     

  • Around December 1964, researchers at the MIT Computation Center sent a memo to the programming staff. “A new command should be written to allow a user to send a private message to another user which may be delivered at the receiver’s convenience,” the note read. Flash forward 45 years, and our inboxes are flooded. Expedia has a 24-hour travel deal. The New Yorkerwould like you to renew your subscription. Your friend is writing with tears in her eyes that she’s in Paris and has been robbed and would you please send money. Facebook wants you to know that someone liked something you wrote a week ago. Your cousin sent the extended family a link to a video of an a cappella group rapping about Hanukkah. Email! There is now so much of it, and more is being created all the time. It's always open in a tab; it's on our phones. Fortunately, VCs are having the same problem--and they're throwing money at it. Check out these 10 startups trying to fix email. [gallery]  

Comments

  1. I only see two products mentioned. Please keep in mind EmailTray, at http://www.emailtray.com, which produces a smart email client with 4 Inboxes where email is sorted by priority.

  2. Dr. Jacob says:

    Some of these services are really useful.  One that is missing from this list though is Mermailer at http://www.mermailer.com.  It tackles the “clutter I sign up for” problem pretty effectively.  I’ve found it quite useful. 

  3. Dr. Jacob says:

    Some of these services are really useful.  One that is missing from this list though is Mermailer at http://www.mermailer.com.  It tackles the “clutter I sign up for” problem pretty effectively.  I’ve found it quite useful. 

  4. Canadanelsons says:

    Smart Labels (gmail labs)  is the most useful thing I have used.  It leaves “important” stuff in the inbox – but I check the “All Mail” labels because my inbox is so empty….

  5. Ruth says:

    Also worth checking out unifiedinbox.com – bringing messages from different streams (email and social) together in one easily managed inbox.

    1. Toby Ruckert says:

      Thanks Ruth for mentioning us – happy to provide you with an invite any time.

  6. Howsabout http://wishery.com/ ? We help you get through your email faster by letting you access frequently-needed info and actions from your other business apps from inside your email client.

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