This Week in New York’s Art World

  • Published each Monday, Happenings is Gallerist‘s guide to events in the New York art world each week.

    MONDAY, OCTOBER 17

    Jens Hoffmann Lectures for Performa
    Performa is bringing together international curators for a series of lectures to discuss organizing biennials and “the future of culture in the 21st century.” Monday night will feature Jens Hoffmann, director of the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts. He will discuss what he calls the “deskilling” of exhibition making.
    NYU Einstein Auditorium, 34 Stuyvesant Street, New York, 6:30 p.m.

    Chris Verene’s “The Self Esteem Salon” with Jessica Grable, “The Self-Preservation Series,” at Postmasters
    Be sure to swing by Postmasters on Monday or Tuesday to see this performance, which was staged in collaboration with Cleopatra’s, whom we profiled last week. A variation on a work the pair made this summer that involved topiary sculpture, this piece will offer attendees a “day spa” complete with massages and audio therapy. And career advice. Curious yet?
    Postmasters Gallery, 459 West 19th Street, New York, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.

    TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18

    Yvonne Rainer’s Poems at The Kitchen
    Choreographer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer will read from her first book of poems, published by artist Paul Chan’s imprint Badland’s Unlimited. Tim Griffin, director and chief curator of The Kitchen, wrote the book’s introduction.
    The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, New York, 7 p.m.

    THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20

    Screening of The Young Man Was Part 1: United Red Army
    Naeem Mohaiemen’s “ultra-left” filmmaking combines documentary footage, essays and photography to create a singular style. The Young Man Was involves the Japanese Red Army highjacking a flight to Bangladesh, the Stammheim suicides and the end of the ’70s scene.
    New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, 7 p.m., $8

    FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21

    “Barnett Newman Paintings” at Craig F. Starr Gallery
    Six paintings by the Ab-Ex master, dating from 1949 to 1960, will be on view at Starr through December 17. As the gallery notes in its release, Newman painted only about 120 paintings during his career, making this a rare pleasure.
    Craig F. Starr Gallery, 5 East 73rd Street, New York, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

    Thomas Kovachevich’s “Shadows and Other Paintings” at Callicoon Fine Arts
    This brand new branch for the upstate New York gallery debuted with a show that consisted of a car that took up the entire space of the small Lower East Side gallery. Show number two will consist of “paintings and sculptures within an installation of painted shadows.”
    Callicoon Fine Arts, 124 Forsyth Street, New York

    SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22

    Cassandra MacLeod, Urs Fischer’s “dngszjkdufiy bgxfjkglijkhtr kydjkhgdghjkd” at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise
    “For Immediate Release” reads the press release for this opening, and then nothing follows except the date and the time. There’s no telling what the couple is up to here–word is that they have designed dozens of tables for the show–but yesterday the GBE Tumblr features fliers for the opening next to a giant bottle of Pommery. So I’d go.
    Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, 620 Greenwich street, New York, October 22, 6-8 p.m.

    Stewart Home and Kenneth Goldsmith Performance at White Columns
    As part of festivities surrounding the first American survey of British writer and artist Stewart Home, poet Kenneth Goldsmith will join him for a special performance.
    White Columns, 320 West 13th Street, New York, 6:30 p.m.

    Michael Krebbers’ “Here Comes the Suns” at Real Fine Arts
    Two days after he unveils new work at Greene Naftali in Chelsea, the German artist will unveil new work at the fast-rising Real Fine Arts gallery in Brooklyn, which currently features the lyrics to The Beatles’ “Here Comes the Sun” on its website.
    Real Fine Arts
    , 673 Meeker Avenue, Brooklyn, 7-10 p.m.

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