18 Varieties of Hines Development: The Bespoke Builders' New York Projects

Location: 885 Third Avenue, New York
Year: 1986, Office Development
Architect: Philip Johnson
Known to all as the Lipstick Building, its most famous tenant is arguably Madoff Securities.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Location: 31 West 52nd Street, New York
Year: 1986, Office Development
Architect: Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates
Built for E.F. Hutton, it stands across the street from fellow landmarks MoMA and CBS's Black Rock.
Location: 450 Lexington Avenue, New York
Year: 1992, Office Development
Architect: David Childs of SOM
Built above the old Grand Central post office, David Polk took half the 800,000-square-foot tower and has never left.
Location: 677 Washington Boulevard, Stamford
Year: 1997, Fee Development
Architect: David Childs of SOM
Home to the largest trading floor in the world, the size of two-football fields.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Location: 55 Railroad Avenue, Greenwich
Year: 1998, Acquisition
Architect: Emery Roth & Sons (1975), Robert A.M. Stern (2002 renovation)
Purchased with CalPERS, the property was flipped in 2004 after the buyers made widespread improvements.
Location: 750 Seventh Avenue, New York
Year: 2000, Acquisition
Architect: Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates
The building, which features an unusual helix design, was long home to Morgan Stanley, whose headquarters are across Broadway. It was sold earlier this year for $485 million to a Kuwaiti concern.
Location: 745 Seventh Avenue, New York
Year: 2002, Fee Development
Architect: KPF
Built for Morgan Stanley, Lehman Brothers bought the building instead and moved in—its green crawl above Times Square becoming favored b-roll during the Financial Crisis.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Location: 383 Madison Avenue, New York
Year: 2002, Fee Development
Architect: David Childs of SOM
Built for Bear Stearns, one of the most serious towers in the city, it is now home to the firm that bought up Bear, JP Morgan.
Location: 425 Lexington Avenue, New York
Year: 2003, Acquisition
Architect: Helmut Jahn
Resembling a classical column clad in glass, the tower is an exemplar of Post-Modern style, which is dominant in Hines' portfolio.
Location: 30 Hudson Street, Jersey City
Year: 2004, Fee Development
Architect: Cesar Pelli, Pelli Clarke Pelli
The work of the same architect as the Patronas Towers, the Goldman Sachs back offices across the river is the tallest building in New Jersey.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Location: 499 Park Avenue, New York
Year: 2003, Acquisition
Architect: I.M. Pei, Pei Cobb Freed
Built in 1980 for George Klein, a fellow aesthete, the tower is Hines' oldest holding in the city, though it has done much to update it since acquiring the tower.
Location: 600 Lexington Avenue, New York
Year: 2004, Acquisition
Architect: Emery Roth & Sons
The latter-day work of the firm responsible for the Empire State Building, 600 Lex was sold to the city's largest landlord, SL Green, for $193 million last year.
Location: 40 Mercer Street, New York
Year: 2006, Residential Development
Architect: Jean Nouvel
Arguably the firm's most ambitious project in New York since the Lipstick Building, and its first residential building here, 40 Mercer was built with Andre Balazs and helped redefine Soho.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Location: 122 Greenwich Avenue, New York
Year: 2009, Residential Development
Architect: KPF
Built with Aby Rosen's RFR Holdings, the project struggled to sell, coming online during the recession, but its penthouse was finally bought earlier this year for $16.9 million, a 22 percent discount.
Location: 600 Washington Avenue, Stamford
Year: 2009, Office Development
Architect: Roger Ferris & Partners
Designed by a lesser-known Connecticut architect, the RBS headquarters is a marquee example of Hines' latter day commitment to sustainability, earning LEED Gold.
Location: 53 West 53rd Street, New York
Year: 2007 (announced), Residential Development
Architect: Jean Nouvel
Announced at the tail-end of the real estate bubble, the project was held up in public review, ultimately lost 200-feet, but it was revived earlier this year by the firm.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Location: 1045 Sixth Avenue, New York
Year: 2011 (announced), Office Development
Architect: Henry Cobb, Pei Cobb Freed
Located at the corner of 40th Street, on the southwestern corner of Bryant Park, the tower's design pays deference to the greenspace across the street.
Location: 56 Leonard Street, New York
Year: 2009 (announced), Residential Development
Architect: Herzog & de Meuron
As The Observer reported today, Hines has taken a stake in the stalled Tribeca condo tower, and with its help, the left-for-dead project will soon rise.

As The Observer reported in this week’s paper, Hines Interests has been one of the foremost developers in New York of the past generation. Even as they have employed some of the most cutting edge architects in the industry, the firm, founded in Houston but now very much global, has managed to keep a surprisingly low profile.

“I would say they are buttoned up, but I wouldn’t say that pejoratively,” architect Henry Cobb said. “It’s a certain sophistication.” Here is a look at the firm’s sophisticated properties built or bought by the firm’s New York office over the past 25 years.

mchaban [at] observer.com | @MC_NYC