SOPA Opera – The Craziest Congressional Takes On Internet Piracy

  • The recent congressional hearing on the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) generated a tidal wave of protest online, with startups censoring their homepages, drafting petitions and Tumblr sending an astonishing 87,000 phone calls to elected officials. But the hearing itself was less of a success. Many of the members of the House Judiciary Committee seemed amused, annoyed and downright dismissive of the anger emanating from the tech community. We gathered together some of their statements, both for and against, to give a flavor of how our lawmakers view online piracy.

  • The recent congressional hearing on the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) generated a tidal wave of protest online, with startups censoring their homepages, drafting petitions and Tumblr sending an astonishing 87,000 phone calls to elected officials. But the hearing itself was less of a success. Many of the members of the House Judiciary Committee seemed amused, annoyed and downright dismissive of the anger emanating from the tech community. We gathered together some of their statements, both for and against, to give a flavor of how our lawmakers view online piracy. [gallery order="DESC"]

Comments

  1. MSgtGunny says:

    @Mark Amodei, trying to hold google responsible for things means you will have to ban liqour stores from selling a certain brand because someone did something against the law while drinking said alcohol, it just doesn’t work.

  2. GrinfishyB says:

    I can’t believe this is the only place I could find a meaningful portion of this debate transcribed. I do have to note a mistake in the quote from Conyers. Conyers, in parodying SOPA opposition, doesn’t say that SOPA “kills, clogs computers.” No, he suggests it “kills
    cloud computer.” Not the cloud computer!

    1. Nitasha Tiku says:

      NOT THE CLOUD! Fixed. Thanks for catching.

  3. taggrinc says:

    What I think is funny about Congressman Deutch using Adele and Drake as examples is that they got their success in the age of the broken music industry. People were worried 10-15 years ago that artists wouldn’t be able to be successful if music sharing was stopped or controlled.  Seems like artists are still succeeding.  Adele’s career started by putting up her demos on Myspace. If she tried that 10-15 years ago with the traditional music business model would she have been as successful?

  4. TheVoiceOfReason says:

    I feel ashamed of Ted Poe being my representative now…